Tag Archives: yaoi

Restricted (Supernatural Fanfic)

Author: cirobert

FanFiction ID: 12383537

WARNING: Mature Audience/Mild Slash

My rating: 3 of 5

Recently, Castiel has been feeling the restrictions of being an angel cooped up in a human’s body. It’s making him grumpy and short, even with the guy he (not so) secretly loves. Really, Cas desperately needs a chance to spread his wings, just for a while . . . but there are all sorts of complications that make that less than practicable. Lucky him, Sam and Dean think they might have a solution–assuming it actually works.

So, I was in the mood for some Supernatural stuff (which, on a side-note, sorry for totally spamming SPN right now), and I found this adorable little fanfic. It’s mostly a happy and fluffy means to a cute Destiel end, despite the issues presented with Cas’s vessel and the complications of the spellwork the boys have to go through to make things work. I feel like the author captured the characters well, and I enjoyed the overall tone of the story. The concept was interesting too; in canon SPN, we get so little of what’s going on in Cas’s mind at any given time that it’s nice to see that explored more. Plus, the development of the relationship between Dean and Castiel was tasteful and convincing. On the downside, there were some mild grammatical issues, but then, it’s nearly impossible to find fanfiction without that. More outstanding was that the author has a bad tendency toward certain sentence structures which, while great for adding color and variety to writing, become kind of repetitive when used all over the place. Still, this was a fun story which I enjoyed, and I’ll probably read more of the author’s work.

Note: You can find this story at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/12383537/1/Restricted.

On a side note, it’s been ages since I’ve read fanfic at all, but recently I’ve just been in the mood for more stories about the characters I love. I’ve found some pretty good ones, too. So I may be including some more reviews (which will be clearly labeled, so you can skip them if desired)–mostly SPN, Merlin, Doctor Who . . . possibly some Superwholock if I can find some good ones (the concept does fascinate me). Anyhow, point being that I’m planning to include these as Media Reviews and stick review links on my Media Room . . . yeah.

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More Happy Than Not

Author: Adam SilveraMore Happy than Not

My rating: 4.5 of 5

WARNING: MATURE AUDIENCE

Every life is a mixture of good stuff and bad stuff. Aaron Soto is no exception, and he tries to be happy with what he’s got. But sometimes it really seems the good just isn’t enough to make up for the bad. Sure, he’s got an incredible girlfriend, a job, a home–but he’s also got the memories of his father’s suicide, his own attempted suicide, poverty, friends who don’t really care. Sometimes it’s so overwhelming that the memory-altering procedure offered by the up-and-coming Leteo Institute really seems like a good option. But when Thomas comes into Aaron’s life, always knowing just what to say, things begin to change . . . for better or for worse.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I picked up More Happy Than Not, and in a lot of senses, this isn’t a book I would usually read. But I have to admit, it pulled me in, right from the first few pages–and the great pacing and interesting story continued throughout. The writing style is very engaging, a personable first-person taste of Aaron. And while his story is certainly sad, it never gets depressing to the point that I didn’t want to continue reading–a balancing act that takes some talent to pull off. There are a lot of things about Aaron that I don’t really care for (like the way he can’t stay committed to a relationship), but the transparent depiction of the conflicts he goes through within himself are honest and moving. And the struggles he deals with in realizing and dealing with his sexuality in a number of senses is eye-opening. I do have to say, the cyberpunk Leteo thing threw me when it became a bigger part of Aaron’s story, although it had kind of been hinted at right from the beginning; I guess I’m just blind in that sense. And the ending really threw me, but at the same time, it works quite well. Finally a word of warning: this is an older YA book, and there is ample sex, drugs, language, violence, etc. But for a mature reader looking for an engaging but challenging story, I think More Happy Than Not is a great choice.

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Konya mo Nemurenai

Konya mo NemurenaiMangaka: Kotetsuko Yamamoto

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Warning: Yaoi/Mature Audience

Rikiya has lived a quiet, reserved high-school life without being in any relationships. Now as he’s entering college, he decides to take matters into his own hands by signing up on a gay dating site. . . . And just as his luck would have it, he falls prey to the worst sorts of folks. Just when he’s in an extremely tight situation, a boy pops right out of the wall (very awkwardly!) and says he owes Rikiya a wish–saving him from the bad guys in the process. When Rikiya pure-heartedly can’t think of anything to wish for, he sends this boy–actually a powerful demon by the name of Endo–back home. Only, I’m pretty sure Rikiya didn’t mean his own home, which is where Endo ends up freeloading while avoiding his own troubles back in the demon realm. Well, it’s not all bad having some company around the apartment, even if he does eat a lot, take the futon for himself, and have an attitude.

So, for a short (3-volume) yaoi manga, I found Konya mo Nemurenai to be pretty cute and interesting. It’s one of those odd instances where I don’t find anything particularly original in it . . . like, I feel like all the major story elements are ones I’ve encountered elsewhere. But Yamamoto-san pieces these elements together skillfully and sweetly such that the story feels comfortable, familiar, and cozy rather than boring or repetitive. I know it’s technically yaoi, but it’s one of the most pure-hearted and innocent of the genre I’ve seen–there are only a few sexually-related scenes in the whole story, although do be warned that there’s one near the beginning that’s pretty bad and scary. The characters really make this story shine: Rikiya’s sweet and shy and accommodating in the extreme, while Endo is, well a demon although in the tamed-down manga sense. He’s unpredictable, relatively amoral, doing what he wants without regard to how it inconveniences others–but at the same time he’s capable of some pretty passionate defense of the things and people he cares about, which is pretty cool. Plus there are a number of other interesting characters who show up as the story goes along, just to stir things up. The art’s nice, expressive and attractive but not too overdone either–it suits the story. I guess I’d mostly only recommend Konya mo Nemurenai to those who enjoy shounen ai/mild yaoi manga, but for that group, I think this is a great read that will be much enjoyed.

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Love Kids!!

Mangaka: Kyo Kitazawa

Warning: Mature Audience/Yaoi

Rintarou and Kyo have been best friends ever since kindergarten (despite the rocky start to their friendship–see Koishite Daddy). The trouble is, Kyo sees Rin as much more than friends–and Rin is oblivious, obsessed as he is with Natsuki (his father’s lover and his own first love). When Rin finally grows up enough to see that Natsuki is an impossible goal, he is heartbroken. Naturally, Kyo becomes his source of comfort–they know each other better than anyone else, so of course Kyo would be the person to go to–but Rin gets more than he expected. A confession, no less! But Rin still has trouble seeing Kyo as anything but a childhood friend. These two have a rocky road ahead, for sure. . . .

Love Kids!! is the sequel to Kitazawa’s Koishite Daddy, taking place years later when the children who were then in kindergarten are in high-school. The art is typical of Kitazawa’s  beautiful style–aesthetically pleasing with a slightly cute flavor. The whole story’s atmosphere is almost shoujo. Koishite Daddy features mature adults and deals with adult topics and settings, but Love Kids!! focuses on high-school students and thus has a vulnerable, wavering, and uncertain feel. It’s sort of heart-poundingly innocent and exciting in that sense. Of course, since Kyo and Rin are both guys, it mostly deals with the challenges faced in that sort of relationship, but I think the feelings of these two will resonate with anyone who has experienced the uncertainties of love. While Love Kids!! is fairly innocent and less graphic than Koishite Daddy, it is still technically yaoi, and thus recommended only for adult audiences; however, I think for those who don’t mind yaoi, it’s a refreshingly pure-hearted and vulnerable story.

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Koishite Daddy

Mangaka: Kyo Kitazawa

Warning: Mature Audience/Yaoi

Recently-divorced Jirou Itou and his five-year-old son Rintarou are just moving in to their new apartment when they encounter an unpleasant scene–their new neighbor, gay university student Natsuki Takahashi, in the middle of a rather violent breakup with his boyfriend. Itou is ready to politely ignore that he’s seen anything, but Rin-chan isn’t bound by any such social walls; noticing that Natsuki is injured, Rin insists that they help him. Somehow, in spite of (or perhaps because of) the awkwardness of their first meeting, the three of them hit it off, and Natsuki quickly becomes just like a part of Itou’s family . . . although he never allows himself to expect anything from friendship from Itou. Somehow though, Itou comes to fall for his cute, kind, lonely neighbor who is so good with kids, and the two become lovers. And in spite of the teasing he receives for his unusual family, Rin-chan is in full support of their relationship–he’s happy to see his dad fall in love and adores his new “mom.”

First of all, if you’re under 21 or don’t like yaoi, don’t read this, okay? Koishite Daddy has got to be the most graphically yaoi manga I’ve ever read; it was actually really embarrassing and awkward in those parts. But . . . there are only a few actual scenes of that, and the rest is more adorable shounen-ai. With the added benefit of an even more adorable little kid–Rin is a great character both as just a cute kid and as a developed individual. In a lot of ways, Koishite Daddy is a cute family story about spending time together, working through problems, balancing relationships, and having fun. It also deals with the issues of blending together a family after a divorce, as well as the challenges kids face when their parents/family situation isn’t like that of most of the other children. Besides the awkwardness (which never happens around the kid, by the way), this is a really good story. The art is very nice as well–cute and pretty both, in a pleasant almost-josei kind of way. I think I would recommend Koishite Daddy to any adult who enjoys a cute family/romance story (and who’s also okay with yaoi).

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Café Latte Rhapsody

Mangaka: Touko Kawai

On first encountering Keito while working at the local bookstore, Serizawa’s impressions are generally: tall, scary, glaring. However, as he observes this unusual regular customer frequently, Seri’s impressions change drastically. More like, cute, shy, skittish, and nice.  And when he runs in to Keito on a rainy day–and finds that Keito is trying to pick up a couple of abandoned kittens–he is affirmed in his opinions of this tall, easily misunderstood young man. Their relationship blossoms (through kittens and lattes and books), until Seri finds that his feelings for Keito are something remarkably close to love. And in a wonder that he never would have expected, those feelings are reciprocated.

I’m too excited to be writing about Café Latte Rhapsody. The sweetness and straightforward earnestness is almost overpowering. But this is such a cute manga. Do be warned: there is a shounen ai/yaoi element. Obviously. Having said that, the mangaka does a great job at keeping the focus where it belongs–on the relationship not the sex–and also does well at keeping the visuals to a 16+ or thereabouts level, as opposed to a gross R level. And the art is super cute. The characters are well envisioned: just ordinary young men, nothing stereotypical, but with definite unique and interesting characters. As for the plot, well the characters themselves say it, their story reads like a shoujo manga–sweet, innocent, and romantic. For those who are okay with shounen ai/yaoi, Café Latte Rhapsody is definitely one of my top recommends.

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Lost Boys

Mangaka: Kaname Itsuki

Warning: Mature Content

Mizuki has never been particularly wanted or needed in his life, so when a mysterious flying boy calling himself “Air” drags him off to Neverland to be the lost boys’ “father,” Mizuki’s only somewhat resistant. Although his lack of a father figure in his own life makes it nearly impossible for him to be truly fatherly to the boys, Mizuki finds that the land, the kids, and Air in particular begin to grow on him. Has Mizuki finally found his place in a world that shouldn’t even exist?

Lost Boys is a well-executed contemporary shounen-ai outtake on Peter Pan. All the classic characters (yes, even Peter) have aged out, but their new counterparts carry on the traditional feel and themes (for the most part, with some distinct exceptions). Certainly, Air has the fey innocence (cluelessness) that Peter did; he’s quite an endearing character. I’m not surprised Mizuki found himself falling for him. The story also has some solid “mending family relationships” themes going for it. As for the shounen-ai element, it’s actually pretty mild (which is really nice & fits well), in the main story at least. Do be warned, though: the omake chapter (which involves different characters) is pure yaoi, so skip it if that bugs you. (Actually it really bugs me. Yech!) Still, this is a cute, creative story with good characters and a nice reinterpretation of the original story. Oh, and the art’s quite nice as well, very pretty and whimsical. It kind of makes me sad that Lost Boys is so short (only 7 chapters, even with the omake), but it works. Actually, I think it would have been story suicide if it had gone much longer. So yeah, Lost Boys is a super-cute shounen-ai retelling of Peter Pan for those of you who would find that interesting. 18+ audience only (because of the omake).

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