Tag Archives: Will Eisner Award

Little Robot

Author/Illustrator: Ben Hatke

My rating: 4.5 of 5

A box tumbles out of a moving truck, only to be discovered by a little girl exploring outside. She opens to box to find a little robot, just the right size to be her friend. These two develop an understanding and a growing friendship, although like any friends they must work through their share of misunderstandings. All is not well, though, as those that made the little robot come searching for it–whether or not it’s willing to go.

The creator of the adorable Zita the Spacegirl has brought us another excellent children’s graphic novel in Little Robot. This is a perfect story for basically anyone; it’s charming, creative, simple, yet engaging. It would actually make a pretty solid easy-reader for children learning to read for themselves. Most of the text is reasonably simple–I actually love that in a few instances where a more difficult concept was being expressed, Hatke actually used a picture in the text bubble rather than trying to use too many words to explain or worse trying to oversimplify the idea. There’s a mild amount of peril, but the ending is happy and satisfying. The little girl in this story (who is never actually named) seems to only be about 5 or thereabouts, although she’s surprisingly precocious in some ways for that age. She’s got a fun personality. Also, points for making her not white and giving her a wrench to carry around and fix stuff. The art in this whole story is Hatke’s typical style–in other words, it’s fabulous. The colors, the lines, the textures, and the angles are all just perfect. Basically, I loved Little Robot and would highly recommend it to anyone of any age.

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Dream Country

Author: Neil Gaiman

The Sandman, vol. 3

My rating: 4.5 of 5

WARNING: MATURE AUDIENCE

A struggling author manages to enslave a muse for his own benefit, inspiring amazing ideas but at what cost? Elsewhere, a stray cat attempts to unite a large enough group of cats to dream the same thing and thus alter reality . . . good luck with that one. Centuries before, Will Shakespeare and his motley band of players perform his Dream for an otherworldly audience. And a woman given transformative powers by the sun-god Ra is cursed to never be truly human again.

I swear, this series just keeps getting better! Dream Country is basically a short-story collection in graphic novel form, featuring four unique stories in which Morpheus is a minor character. All four are strange and unique and kind of wonderful in different ways. Which isn’t to say that they’re all happy and fun; some of them, perhaps even parts of all of them, are dark and pensive. Creative and brilliant, still. My favorite was the one featuring Shakespeare–which incidentally won a World Fantasy Award. The story itself is lovely and strange, and Charles Vess’s artwork is just perfect for it. Actually, Vess’s art is basically ideal for Gaiman’s writing in general, or at least for his fantasy; they mesh ridiculously well. The art for the whole collection is quite nice, although for the last story (the Ra one) I struggled for the first bit to figure out what on earth was actually going on. I think that’s just the story and how strange it is, mostly, though. I would highly recommend Dream Country, both for those who are in the midst of reading The Sandman as a series and for those who are just interested in a collection of independent graphic shorts by Gaiman; I don’t think the previous or future volumes are necessary to enjoy this collection.

Covers & Design by Dave McKean/Illustrated by Charles Vess, Malcolm Jones III, Kelley Jones,  & Colleen Doran/Lettered by Todd Klein

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The Doll’s House

Author: Neil Gaiman

The Sandman, vol. 2

My rating: 4.5 of 5

WARNING: MATURE AUDIENCE

After his long absence from the Dream world and his imprisonment in the world of the living, Morpheus returns to Dream to survey his lands, taking stock of those members who are missing and beginning his search for them. Little does he know that some of his younger siblings among the Endless are stirring up trouble for him in secret. Meanwhile, in the human world, Rose Walker is united in England for the first time with her grandmother Unity (a victim of the sleeping sickness that came over so many children for a time) and subsequently returns to the United States to search for her long-lost little brother in hopes of uniting the family. She meets a number of interesting individuals during her search, including Morpheus himself, unwitting that she herself is a dream vortex that he must deal with or risk the destruction of Dream entirely.

Well, I have to say that, although I was not particularly impressed with the first Sandman comic, Preludes & Nocturnes, Gaiman thoroughly made up for the issues I found in that book in The Doll’s House. It made me regret having waited so long to press on with the series. Whereas Preludes & Nocturnes never truly felt like Gaiman’s work, never really set properly (barring that lovely last chapter), The Doll’s House feels throughout like one of his books. It has the right flavor, the right perspectives on things, the right spark that I can’t properly describe; I can only say that it works. The entire volume reads like a novel, having a cohesive plot with multiple, interlacing stories. It also traces back to stories told in the first volume, actually giving them more weight and purpose in my mind. I really loved all the dream sequences that were a part of this book and the way in which they played into the plot. Even more so, I appreciated the way in which the author discussed the ideas of destiny and fate and free will; you would think this theme would be exhausted by now, but it’s something so integral to humanity that perhaps it will always be a pertinent topic. I like Rose’s character as well; she’s got spunk but she’s also kind of broken, and it’s interesting to see that developed. The art is very well done, although still in a very comic-book style that I’m still gradually adjusting to. Fair warning that this is definitely geared for an adult audience and there’s some pretty gristly violence (though not nearly as bad as the first volume) and some nudity here. I definitely enjoyed reading The Doll’s House and am now actually quite looking forward to future volumes of The Sandman in spite of the series’ rocky start.

Covers & Design by Dave McKean/Illustrated by Mike Dringenberg & Malcolm Jones III/Colored by Zylonol/Lettered by Todd Klein & John Costanza

 

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Awkward

awkwardAuthor/Illustrator: Svetlana Chmakova

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Peppi Torres manages to thoroughly mess up her first day in her new middle school by 1) tripping in the hall and dumping all her books, 2) getting helped by Jaime, a quiet kid with a reputation as a huge nerd, and then 3) pushing him and running away. Following this fiasco, Peppi does manage to find a place for herself in the school’s art club where she makes some good friends . . . even if she’s pretty much on her own during the rest of the school day. She still feels awfully guilty over pushing Jaime, especially when he begins tutoring her in math. And life becomes even more complicated when Peppi’s art club and the science club–of which Jaime is a member–become locked in a fierce competition for a table at the school’s cultural festival. Totally awkward, especially since Peppi finds that Jaime might actually be a great friend.

I absolutely loved Awkward! I can’t believe I haven’t seen it getting more love. This is a fantastic realistic slice-of-life school story for everyone–in graphic novel style. The setting is middle-school, so obviously that’s the primary intended audience, but the story is great and the messages it holds are valid for everyone (I’d say upper elementary and older). The writing tone is great–it captures that, well, awkwardness of being in middle school and figuring life out and all extremely well. The things Peppi goes through are credible, the sorts of issues that real people actually deal with. But the story is also funny and immensely positive in its message. It’s a great encouragement to work hard, work together, make all sorts of friends, and believe in possibilities. The characters are rich and fun to read, full of personality and individuality. And the art does a great job of reflecting this, with expressive character designs, attractive coloring, and a layout that’s easy to follow and focuses strongly on the people. I would definitely recommend Awkward to all sorts of people, and especially to those who enjoy graphic novels or are at that, well, awkward stage of life themselves.

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Smile

Author/Illustrator: Raina Telgemeier

Color by: Stephanie Yue

As though all the usual pains of growing up weren’t enough, one night after Girl Scouts Raina has an accident that knocks out her two front teeth. Oww! In addition to the obvious physical pain, she has to deal with the psychological and social troubles caused by the change in her appearance. It would really help if she had supportive friends . . . but her group isn’t exactly ready to make her feel better about herself. But life goes on, and in time (and through numerous challenging circumstances) Raina begins to find where she fits and to gain the confidence to smile, even if her smile doesn’t look perfect.

I’ve been seeing Smile around for a while, but didn’t realize it was a graphic novel until I picked it up to read. (I know, I’m a little slow on the uptake sometimes.) Having read this incredible graphic novel memoir, I was highly impressed. This is a voice that we desperately need today. Telgemeier brings graphic novels from a place of fantasy to where they truly hit home. She speaks honestly and transparently to the struggles of growing up in a voice that we instantly relate to and that is absolutely credible. Moreover, she speaks to the issue of self-image in such a painfully honest manner–as she says in the novel, maybe if we talked about this sort of thing more, kids wouldn’t feel like they were the only ones dealing with this sort of stuff. I think the art fits the story perfectly; it’s expressive and dynamic, honestly showing the characters with all their flaws but also with full, vibrant personalities clearly shining through. I would give Smile high recommendations, especially for kids in that challenging middle-school to high-school time of transition–I know it made me smile!

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Fables: Legends in Exile

Author: Bill Willingham/Illustrators: Lan Medina, Steve Leialoha, Sherilyn van Valkenburgh, James Jean, & Alex Maleev/Letterer: Todd Klein 

Fables, vol. 1

Once upon a time, the characters inhabiting our favorite fairy tales were driven from their homes by “the Adversary.” Now, these very people reside–practically immortal–in New York, blending in to present-day society and handling their own problems through their own secret government. Snow White is the Director of Operations for this government, directly under King Cole, and she has not had a good day. And it only gets worse when Bigby Wolf, her security officer, drags her off to a crime scene . . . her sister Rose Red’s apartment–blood-splattered and with no sign of Rose in sight!

I think the idea behind the Fables series is fascinating, and Bill Willingham executes it brilliantly in Legends in Exile. What stands out most to me about this story is the characters–they aren’t always what you’d expect from the fairy tales, but they work. More importantly, they have strong, consistent personalities that are carried through everything from their dialogue to the way they’re drawn. Snow White and Bigby in particular are also intricate and individual people–and with Snow in particular, you can see the conflict between who she is and who she sees herself to be, which is fascinating. The focal story of Legends in Exile (besides introducing the overarching themes and characters) is a murder mystery, done in classic style; it’s an effective traditional use of the genre (if you can say it’s traditional when the suspects include fantasy characters) told with a wry humor. The art is quite nice for a graphic novel (I’m still adjusting to the graphic novel style); a lot less stylized and blood-splattered than I’ve seen in some. I would note that this is definitely for mature readers and contains sex, language, and violence. Still, for mature readers who enjoy fantasy or graphic novels, I think Fables: Legends in Exile is a solid, engaging, and unique story that would be a fun read.

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