Tag Archives: spinoff

The Legends of River Song

Authors:  Jenny T. Colgan, Jaqueline Rayner, Steve Lyons, Guy Adams, & Andrew Lyonsthe-legends-of-river-song

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Professor River Song. The mysterious woman who traipses backwards through the Doctor’s life, growing younger even as he grows older. Archaeologist, psychopath, convicted murderer. Child of the TARDIS. A veritable lifetime of spoilers and secrets and untold wonders. Little surprise then that her diary is her closest and best-guarded confidante. And luck those who get to sample its contents.

The Legends of River Song is a collection of short stories set in the same universe as Doctor Who, but focusing particularly on the fabulous Professor River Song. I believe (haven’t taken the trouble to go back and check) that they’re all written as though taken from the pages of her diary; at any rate, the memorable ones were. The collection is quite a mixture of tales, but I think all will appeal to those who enjoy Doctor Who and River’s character in particular. “Suspicious Minds” by Jacqueline Rayner was probably my favorite Doctor/River story both because the story was interesting and, even more so, because she nails the characters of Eleven and River so well, particularly the unique dynamic between the two. (And it’s really interesting to have Eleven described through River’s eyes!) “Death in New Venice” by Guy Adams and “River of Time” by Andrew Lane were both excellent just River stories that flesh out her character nicely. “A Gamble of Time” by Steve Lyons is, while scientifically paradoxical, quite an interesting and exciting story as well. Personally, I found “Picnic at Asgard”  by Jenny T. Colgan to be the big disappointment of this collection (which is really tragic, since it’s the first story in the volume; don’t be discouraged, and push past it). Mostly, I felt that Colgan just missed River’s character, perhaps only by a hair, but enough for the story to feel off the entire time I was reading it. Still, overall The Legends of River Song is a nice little collection that I enjoyed and would recommend.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Necromancer: A Novella

Author: Lish McBridenecromancer

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Matt didn’t have many friends when he was little. Actually, Ashley might have been the only person who he really clicked with, ever. That is, until she died. . . . But recently, she’s been coming around to hang out again–as Death, or as she says it, as a Harbinger. Whatever that actually is. Not that Matt actually has a clue what she does as a Harbinger. But this evening, on a trip to a diner for waffles, he might just get to find out.

Okay, so clarifications first. Necromancer isn’t actually a novella; it’s a short story “Death and Waffles” along with previews of two of McBride’s other books. The short story is a tie-in to Lish McBride’s amazing story, Hold Me Closer, Necromancer. I really enjoyed the short story. You see a good bit of Ashley in the other Necromancer books, but this story shows a bit more personal side of her. It’s nice to see more than the Harbinger in the school-girl uniform who demands payment in waffles . . . well, okay, some things never change. Point is, I love McBride’s writing and her characters. They’re fun to read, and they’re memorable long after you’ve finished reading. Plus, Necromancer is a great chance to give her writing a try at minimal risk–you can pick it up for free on Nook or Kindle (probably elsewhere too). Definitely recommended.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

The Angel’s Kiss: A Melody Malone Mystery

Author: Justin Richardsthe angel's kiss

My rating: 3.5 of 5

*SPOILER ALERT*: This book ties in to the seventh series of Doctor Who, and there may be spoilers for those who haven’t seen this series yet. And really, a huge part of the appeal of this story will be exclusively for those who have seen the series.

Melody Malone–sole detective and owner of the Angel Detective Agency. You could say that she specializes in a certain sort of case. Not that she isn’t intrigued when Rock Railton, one of the most attractive actors around, comes by–flirting atrociously and claiming someone’s out to kill him. But Melody isn’t hooked, not until she hears the phrase “kiss of the angel”. But when she comes around to a party–at Rock’s invitation–she encounters an ancient hobo who begs her assistance and a Rock Railton who doesn’t even recognize her. Something very strange is going on. . . .

Fans of Doctor Who will likely recognize The Angel’s Kiss as a book that showed up in the show–a book written by River Song under the pen name of Melody Malone, which ended up playing a large part in the plot of an episode or two. (As a complete aside, there’s got to be a word for that, right? Books that show up in other stories but that previously didn’t exist in the outside world? Like the Simon Snow books, and Carry On in specific, since it became an actual physical book afterward in a slightly different form. It’s been bugging me, so if you know, please comment.) In any case, the text of this actual e-book isn’t the same as what you hear in the TV show. But there’s a definite River Song tone to the whole story which totally makes it. The entire book is written in first person, and you can hear her bad-girl vibe coming through strongly throughout. That and the humor, sass, and attitude with which the story is told are what bring this mystery from dime novel to dazzling, really. (And it is very funny. I caught myself laughing aloud in public several times. Oops.) The Doctor Who references are also a definite plus. As you can imagine, the story involves the Weeping Angels as a major plot device . . . so it was weird to me that their mechanics were different from what I’ve seen previously for them. But then, they’re an intelligent alien species, so I guess they can pick different ways to do things. It does work with the plot–although let’s face it, the plot is always secondary to Melody’s brilliance. Which is just the way I like it; River is a favorite of mine. I’d recommend The Angel’s Kiss for Doctor Who fans . . . I think it would probably fall a bit flat without the context, even though it doesn’t really play directly into the plot. More like, it plays way too much into the humor, so you’d miss all the parts that make it really good. But yeah, for fans, very much a recommended read.

Note: As far as I know, this is only available in e-book format (but if you find a hard copy, let me know).

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

My Little Pony: Humble Bundle

Authors: Jeremy Whitley & Ted Andersonmy little pony humble bundle

Illustrators: Tony Fleecs & Brenda Hickey/Colors: Heather Breckel/Lettering: Neil Uyetake

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Just to clarify, this post is not about the recent Humble Bundle deal on My Little Pony comics (addressed here). Rather, this is a review of the physical comic that was offered as a part of that deal exclusively for Humble Bundle, titled My Little Pony: Humble Bundle. This book consists of two stories. In the first, the Cutie Mark Crusaders–Sweetie Belle, Apple Bloom, & Scootaloo–find themselves completely out of ideas for trying to find their special talent . . . until Discord comes along to “give them a hand”. The second tells of Twilight’s early days of getting to know Spike, back at magic school when he was just a baby dragon.

I was truly thrilled with this comic. The stories are original and interesting while still being consistent with the television series completely. Rather, you might say that they are stories that have needed to be told; they’re very satisfying. The characters are consistent, and the stories are great fun. Discord even makes a Q (Star Trek ) reference–which you have to admit has been due ever since Discord first appeared. The art is slightly different in style than the TV show, but it works well and is attractive. Ooh, and the covers and pin-up art by Sara Richard are just gorgeous, seriously. My Little Pony: Humble Bundle was a lot of fun to read. I know it was an exclusive, so it will be hard to find, but if you happen to get your hands on it, definitely read it.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Torchwood: The Lost Files

BBC Radio 4torchwood the lost files

My rating: 4 of 5

Spinoff of Torchwood

Following the dramatic conclusion of season 2 of Torchwood, Capt. Jack Harkness, Gwen Cooper, and Ianto Jones are still on the case protecting Earth from alien threats. Whether it’s close to home or at the bottom of the Marianas Trench, Torchwood is ready to do whatever it takes–hey, most of the time they enjoy the challenge and the adventure. They’re that sort of people.

So, The Lost Files is a BBC Radio 4 audio drama set shortly after the conclusion of season 2 (mostly) of the TV series. It stars the original cast members, which is a big plus for me (I love John Barrowman and Eve Myles’ work on this show). The audio drama consists of three separate episodes of around 40-45 minutes each. Is it strange that I actually like this better than I liked the original TV series? I think the plots are fairly similar to what you’d see in the show, but the ideas are adapted to work well in a full-cast audio drama sort of setting. The actors adapt well to being off screen, too. One of the things I liked was that, while still consistent with the original TorchwoodThe Lost Files isn’t quite as sexually oriented, or even maybe quite as cynical, although it still maintains a much darker tone than, say, Doctor Who. Speaking of, there are a number of fun Doctor Who references thrown into the stories, which is always fun. And the third episode of The Lost Files, I must say, is kind of cathartic after watching Children of Earth; that was unexpected and nice. I guess mostly I would only recommend this drama to those who have already watched and seen at least the first two episodes of Torchwood, although there aren’t a ton of spoilers, so it might be OK as long as you’re familiar with the basic setting and plot. Either way, it was interesting; I wish they’d done more than three episodes.

Directed by Kate McAll/Written by Rupert Laight, Ryan Scott, & James Goss/Starring John Barrowman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, & Kai Owen/Based on Torchwood by Russell T. Davies

 

5 Comments

Filed under Media Review

A Fall of Stardust

By Neil Gaiman & Charles Vessa fall of stardust

My rating: 4.5 of 5

A Fall of Stardust is a unique little collection that I got as part of Gaiman’s recent Humble Bundle. It’s kind of a reader alluding to his (incredible) novel Stardust. Remarkably, it’s only about 14 pages long, including the cover, yet it packs quite the punch. The majority of the volume is a short story (almost more of a vignette) about a girl named Jenny who watches as magpies gather around her, recalling a superstitious poem about them and truly experiencing that one precious moment of her life. It’s a truly beautiful piece. The remainder is a short group of poems that somehow or another connect to the world behind the Wall. My favorite is the last, which is a pantoum–making the repeating lines actually work in context and make sense is somewhat mindblowing to me. And of course, the whole collection is illustrated in Charles Vess’ skillful hand, which I always enjoy seeing paired with Gaiman’s writing; it just fits. So yeah, if you’ve enjoyed Stardust in the past and get a chance to read A Fall of Stardust, I think you’d likely find it enjoyable (plus it’s a quick read).

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Another Note: The Los Angeles BB Murder Cases

Author: Nisioisinanother note the los angeles bb murder cases

Based on: Death Note by Tsugumi Ohba & Takeshi Obata

My rating: 4.5 of 5

When Kira brought terror to the criminals of the world using a secret Death Note, he found himself confronted by former FBI agent Naomi Misora. But years before the Kira case, Misora was already becoming, in some way, connected to those future events. Because it was years earlier, back in Los Angeles, that she first worked on a case with the great detective L, a case that was unique in many respects. When L first contacted her to be his eyes on the scene (rarely if ever appearing in public himself), there have already been three violent murders, each with some distinctive characteristics: wara ningyo nailed to the walls of the victim’s room, victims with alliterative initials, clues to the next murder left at the scene. Almost as though the whole thing were some horrible game. . . . Even stranger, Naomi somehow finds herself cooperating with a most unusual private detective who goes by the name Ryuzaki, loves sweets to an obscene extent, and who is clearly more clever than he lets on. Very suspicious. . . .

I really love The Los Angeles BB Murder Cases. Ever since I first read in Death Note the mention that L and Naomi had worked together on a case before (with no further explanation), I knew that was a story I would love to hear. And Nisioisin was a great choice to write this story; he’s an excellent light novelist, and I think he preserves the essences of the characters from the original manga excellently while crafting a brilliant original story at the same time. I think this light novel will particularly appeal to those who like puzzles and such–because really the whole murder scheme is a big puzzle created to challenge L. Macabre, I know, but interesting all the same. But even if you don’t feel like trying to reason out the puzzles along with our detectives, it’s fascinating enough watching their interactions from a more psychological standpoint. Ryuzaki in particular is an intriguing character: see if you can guess his identity, but be warned, he’s tricksy. I also have to note that the very Japanese writing style (in the voice of Mello, no less), suits the story well, even though it is set in the U.S. My one . . . not exactly complaint, but the one thing I didn’t really love, is the inclusion of shinigami eyes into the mix. I’m still not sure if they were intended to make it seem less violent or more mysterious or just to provide a greater connection to the original manga, but it just seemed unnecessarily complicating to me. On the whole though, Another Note: The Los Angeles BB Murder Cases is an excellent light novel, particularly for readers who enjoy the Death Note manga/anime or who like detective stories; I would definitely recommend this book.

On a side note, while I rarely have much to say regarding the actual physical publication of books, this volume is an exception. It’s a work of art, absolutely. The black matte cover with a cool/creepy silver design on it, the partial-height white dust jacket that carries the silver design seamlessly on to it’s high quality paper, the equally impressive quality of the paper the story is printed on, and the classy design of the pages themselves are all extremely impressive to a book geek like myself. Very nice.

6 Comments

Filed under Book Review