Tag Archives: social issues

EXPIRED | Deal Alert: Forbidden Books Humble Bundle

banned book week posterIn honor of this year’s Banned Book Week (9/23-9/29), Humble Bundle is offering a selection of banned, challenged, and generally controversial books and graphic novels. Find out what all the fuss is about, and speak up against censorship. If you’re interested(in the bundle), you can find out more here. And to find out more about Banned Book Week itself, check out the ALA’s page on it at http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/banned.

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Landscape with Invisible Hand

Author: M. T. Anderson

My rating: 5 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience (for language and dark themes, but mostly for language)

Young artist Adam Costello and his family remember a time when things were different. But it seems like a long time ago, now. Since the vuvv made first contact, bringing promises of new technology and wealth, well, everything has changed–and not for the better. Sure, the ultra-wealthy who live in close contact with the vuvv may have a pretty comfortable life. But for everyone else, the coming of the vuvv has meant nothing but hardship: economic collapse, no jobs, looting, costs of medicine going through the roof. Everyone is forced to make tough choices, and Adam chronicles it all in paint, watercolor, and VR rendering.

On the one hand, I’m not surprised that Landscape with Invisible Hand hasn’t made a big splash in the YA community or in the literary community as a whole. (I hadn’t even heard of it until I stumbled on it in the library, and the average Goodreads rating is only 3.59.) Because while this is a solid dystopian novel (novella, whatever), it’s hitting towards the end of that genre’s popularity storm and the type of dystopian is just enough off from the mainstream that it’s not going to fly so well. Plus, it’s not all mushy romance and fighting the invading hordes. It’s dark and depressing at times. . . . Which brings me to why, on the other hand, I’m shocked that this book hasn’t taken the literary world by storm. Other than the obvious–this is an M. T. Anderson book, people! Why is it not getting attention?! But back to my point: this book is one of the most intentionally, incredibly artistic books I have read in a long time. It delves into the darkness and reveals the underlying truths . . . and finds the spark of hope in it all. The topics it handles–while couched in terms of an alien invasion–are incredibly timely for readers today, at times painfully so. Not to mention that the writing itself, the actual choice and arrangement of the words, is remarkable. It’s all present tense, sparse, yet artistic, each word carefully chosen that–were it not for the obvious paragraph structure–I might almost have thought I was reading free-verse poetry; it has that sort of feel to it. Even the book design feeds into the whole artistic structure of the whole–the unusual proportions, the cover that looks like an oil painting on canvas, the way each chapter is outlined and titled by the picture Adam is working on at that time. I get that it’s not for everyone, but I would really recommend giving Landscape with Invisible Hand a try, even if the initial premise doesn’t sound so interesting. Because this reach of this story goes far beyond what it promises on the surface.

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Popular Hits of the Showa Era

Author: Ryū Murakami/Translator: Ralph McCarthypopular-hits-of-the-showa-era

My rating: 3.5 of 5

WARNING: MATURE AUDIENCE (21+)

A random act of violence ignites a war between two previously laconic and loosely organized groups of individuals.  On the one hand, a group of young men who gather together for no particular reason and whose highest aspirations are to peep on the neighbor through the window and sing karaoke on the beach. On the other, a collection  of somewhat older women–“aunties” if you will–united by nothing more than a common personal name. But as hatred of the other group sparks, both the young men and the aunties suddenly find themselves united against each other, motivated and inspired in ways they’ve never known before. And the heat of that fervor drives them to find more and more creative ways to rain destruction on the opposing party.

I initially found Popular Hits of the Showa Era through a review by Arria Cross@Fujinsei–which you should go read right away, because it’s excellent and informative and also fun. One of the things Arria mentions about this book is the dark humor of it, and I can totally see that it is written to appeal to a dark sense of humor. Personally, I didn’t find it funny (sorry), but I can very much appreciate that there are people to whom this book would be absolutely hilarious in a disturbing sort of way. But even though I didn’t find it humorous myself, I still found this book enjoyable in other senses. For one, it’s an intriguing commentary and satire on contemporary Japanese society, and just the flavor of the culture is interesting. Even more so, I found the psychological exploration of the book to be fascinating–the way in which the characters were just drifting through life and also the way in which this conflict affected them, making them feel alive and purposeful. I kind of think the author’s telling us something dangerous and terrifying but also important about humanity here. And I have to warn, this is NOT a book for everyone, and I would advise to approach it with caution. Because it is very, very violent. Bloody and gory and explicit and violent. There’s purpose for that in the story; it isn’t violent just for the sake of being violent. But it’s still there, very much in your face for the entirety of the story. Finally, I did want to comment on the title: Popular Hits of the Showa Era. Each chapter title  is the name of a song that was popular during the Showa Era, and that song flavors and flows throughout the chapter in one way or another–not that it has a huge effect on the story itself, but it’s a nice touch.

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Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Author: Becky Albertallisimon vs the homo sapiens agenda

My rating: 5 of 5

Simon has met a boy . . . er, well, they haven’t actually met yet. But he and Blue found each other on their high school’s Tumblr, and they’ve been exchanging e-mails. And the more Simon gets to know Blue, the more he thinks he might really be in love with this guy, whoever he is in real life. Which is where things get sticky–because they go to the same high school and might actually know each other in real life, only neither knows the other’s true identity. Neither is openly out to the community at large, and Blue at least intends to keep it that way. That might not be so easy though, especially when Simon finds that Martin, one of this classmates, has gotten into his e-mail account, read his e-mails to Blue, and is now using them to blackmail him! Very sticky situation. Not that Simon doesn’t have enough other stuff to keep him occupied, what with friend problems, a big production coming up in drama club, and a family that wants to talk about everything.

I know, I know, everyone’s been telling me to read this book for like a year at least now. And yes, I really loved Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda. The writing style is excellent, fitting the YA genre well but in a way that would be interesting even for older readers. I really loved the transcribed e-mails and the way in which Simon and Blue’s relationship grew through them, the way they fell in love with each other without even knowing what the other person looked like or anything. Their relationship is really sweet and funny. I also loved that the story’s not just a romance or a coming out story, although it definitely is that–rather, it’s Simon’s whole life with all of it’s complexities and relationships. I love his family and the way their relationships work; it’s so nice to read a story with a supportive, functional family on occasion. (And is it just me, or did anyone else find Simon’s sister Nora to be fascinating? I really want to read her story now!) Also, I loved Simon himself–his personality feels authentic and complex, like the way he thinks he’s so profane and badass but everyone knows he’s just adorable, or the way he’s definitely a geek but not in any stereotypical way. Speaking of being a geek, there are tons of references thrown into this book, too. Anyway, I could fangirl about the positives of this book for basically forever . . . negatives? Well, yes, it is a bit profane, so just be aware it’s probably PG13 at least, but other than that, I can’t think of anything at all. I would say that Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda is highly recommended.

 

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Tender Morsels

Author: Margo Lanagantender morsels

My rating: 3.5 of 5

WARNING: Mature Audience/Contains rape & incest

Ever since her mother’s death, Liga has lived in abuse and isolation, first from her father and later from the young men in her village. In a moment of desperation, Liga decides to end her own life and that of her baby daughter–only to have a most mysterious being interfere and offer her another way out: an exchange of her life in the real world for a safe life in her own personal “heaven.” And so, for many years, Liga and her two daughters live safely in peace . . . but the real world won’t be kept out forever, nor will strong-willed girls be kept in.

If you’ve read anything by Margo Lanagan, you won’t be surprised when I say that Tender Morsels was dark and unsettling. I think if you leave a book of hers undisturbed, you’ve read it wrong. Tender Morsels takes several story elements from the classic fairy tale, “Snow White and Rose Red,” and transforms them into a dark but hopeful tale. It wrestles with the harms women can and do receive from men–and with bringing that fact into balance with the wonderful, healthy relationships that are also possible. It deals with the concept of escapism and the fact that life is meant to be lived fully–the hurts, yes, but also the glorious joys and loves that it can bring. I think Lanagan’s handling of these concepts was well done; meaningful, conflicted, and thought-provoking to be sure. I also appreciated that she dealt with some very difficult topics without cheapening them by making them erotic or overly detailed, while still maintaining the painful emotional impact of them. Honestly, I probably should rate this book a 5 of 5, but it just didn’t work that well for me in some regards. I can’t even say why exactly . . . the plot was too loose and all over the place, perhaps? I’m not sure who the actual protagonist even is? I can’t even say how I really feel about the ending? Whatever the case, Tender Morsels was an excellently written story, just not one of my personal favorites.

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Ghosting

ghostingAuthor: Edith Pattou

My rating: 5 of 5

On the last weekend of summer, right before the beginning of senior year, a group of teens find themselves thrown together. Some of them have close connections. For others, any connections they may have had are by now ancient history. Others barely have any connection to the group at all. But on this one night, they go to a party together. And that’s when things begin to go horribly wrong.

Wow, incredible book. First off, Ghosting isn’t a ghost story–it has nothing to do with ghosts, except perhaps our own personal ones. Secondly, it’s nothing like what I was expecting from Edith Pattou; everything I’ve read of hers previously has been awesome fantasies or fairy tale retellings. This book is more like a modern-day nightmare, at least for the first part. It’s the tale of several teens–a largely diverse group–and one ill-fated evening where everything seems to go from bad to worse in an ever-increasing weight of bad karma. Drugs, alcohol, dares . . . and finally a gunshot. It’s pretty horrifying. But the author handles the whole situation very well. And the second half of the book, the aftermath if you will, is immensely healing, beautiful even. It’s the sort of story that both warns against making dangerous choices and also offers hope for those who have made those choices. I love that the entire story is told in free-verse poetry, from the perspectives of numerous individuals. The author does a great job of making each person’s voice and perspective shine distinctly. Ghosting is both a terrible and a beautiful story, definitely one that’s best for a more mature audience, yet one that is tasteful and meaningful. Highly recommended.

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Ann Tenna

Author/Illustrator: Marisa Acocella MarchettoAnn Tenna

My rating: 3 of 5

Ann Tenna and her higher self “SuperAnn” are agreed (well, Ann’s mostly forced into agreement): she’s to be reborn on Earth once again, a final chance to get things right. But 39 years later, Ann has completely forgotten her higher self, her mission, everything but her present life. And what a life! She’s made herself something of an internet legend with her brutal hidden-camera show. Not exactly getting it right, but definitely making good . . . until SuperAnn gets involved and reminds her what she’s really there for.

So as you can see, Ann Tenna only got a 3-star rating from me (which is still not bad, I must say). Basically, it was an interesting story, but I also had issues with it. For what it’s worth, I finished the entire graphic novel in less than a whole day, so it clearly wasn’t wholly bad. The concept was interesting, and the pacing worked well, never getting stale or bogged down. I think the graphic novel format definitely helped with that. As for the art itself, if worked for the story, hovering somewhere on the border between classic comics and the more contemporary graphic novel style–although I think for me the style and coloring tended just a bit too much toward the comic-book end of the spectrum. On a positive note, you’ve got a successful upper-thirties woman who is going on a journey of self-awareness and change; I feel like you get that a lot with teenage coming-of-age sorts of stories, but in the context of a more mature woman, I haven’t seen those themes developed much (maybe that’s just because I read a lot of YA, but it was still nice). The negative side of that is that I really don’t like who Ann is as a person–the whole dog-eats-dog mindset is not only foreign but utterly abhorrent to me. And I guess just the whole society she lives in is one I can’t relate to at all, so the story kind of lost me a lot in that regard. Basically, I have really mixed opinions about this graphic novel; I can’t say I strongly recommend reading Ann Tenna, but neither do I discourage reading it. Up to you.

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