Tag Archives: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Case of the Baker Street Flat Mate (Sherlock Holmes Fanfic)

Author: bemj11 

FanFiction ID: 5826683

Status: Complete (58 chapters)

My rating: 4 of 5

It’s common knowledge around Scotland Yard that any extended time around amateur detective Sherlock Holmes (or any time around him, really) is liable to drive a person mad. So when it becomes known that he has a new flat mate, a Dr. John Watson, bets begin to fly regarding how long it will take for Dr. Watson to move out again. But right from the start, Inspector Lestrade finds something unique in the relationship between Holmes and Watson. And when Dr. Watson stays on beyond the limits estimated by the most daring of gamblers, going so far as to nag Holmes into doing things no one would even suggest he do, Lestrade finds him increasingly fascinating.

The Case of the Baker Street Flat Mate is a fabulous fanfic based on Doyle’s original Sherlock Holmes stories. Told in first-person from Inspector Lestrade’s perspective, it chronicles his observations of Dr. Watson from their first meeting up to just past Reichenbach. The stories start out more, well, detective-like, observing Watson’s relationship with Holmes, his skills both as a physician and as a soldier, that sort of thing. But there’s a growing friendship between Lestrade and Watson that shines through as the stories go along that’s nice. The stories find a good balance of humor and adventure, managing to stay fairly lighthearted in all but the most tragic sections. I enjoyed the way this fanfic is told as a string of short, disconnected stories–almost vignettes, really–as opposed to a fully integrated plotline. This way of telling the story works well to show us a gradually developing relationship over time. And the short chapters make the story convenient to read in bits as time allows (although I must confess, I devoured the entire 58 chapters in just a few days). Definitely recommended.

Note: You can find The Case of the Baker Street Flat Mate at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5826683/1/The-Case-of-the-Baker-Street-Flat-Mate.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Media Review

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Omnibus Edition)

Author: Alan Moorethe league of extraordinary gentelmen omnibus

Illustrator: Kevin O’Neill

My Rating: DNF

Warning: Mature Audience

In England during the year 1898, a mysterious unnamed individual–going merely by M–has begun collecting a most unusual group of people together. Strayed to the outskirts of society and beyond by choice or chance, these individuals have both the will and the abilities to do what many might consider impossible. And perhaps, for the sake of their country, they might even be motivated to have the will to work together and accomplish the task.

First off, apologies to those who love this, admittedly classic, comic book–you should probably stop reading now. Actually, this particular review is for myself more than for anyone else, so that when I look back in 5 years and wonder whatever happened to the characters, I’ll be reminded of all the reasons I stopped reading to begin with. Because The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen has the potential to be a wonderful story. The premise is intriguing, the blending of Victorian period literature and style with the superhero comic. I would even say that, at times, Moore and O’Neill manage to pull it off. Certainly, a familiarity with and appreciation of classic literature will certainly increase one’s appreciation of the comic–the incorporation of characters and stylistic elements was one of the things I appreciated the most. So if there’s that much good, why did I stop halfway through with no intention of ever picking this comic up again to finish it? Because I found this comic to also be racist, sexist, violent, bawdy, and offensive in the extreme. Is that seriously necessary?! So yes, I won’t elaborate further, but I can’t recommend The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, nor will I ever read any of it again.

4 Comments

Filed under Book Review

Sherlock (TV series)

BBCSherlock

My rating: 5 of 5

Dr. John Watson has come home from Afghanistan due to a war injury, and he’s having trouble adapting to civilian life . . . financially and psychologically. So when an old friend introduces him to Sherlock Holmes–a most interesting and unusual man who is willing to share the rent for a flat–John finds himself rapidly accepting the offer. Life with the self-proclaimed “consulting detective” soon draws Dr. Watson into a whirlwind, solving crimes and assisting Holmes in whatever capacity he can–certainly in a medical one. Perhaps even as a friend, whatever the sociopathic  Holmes may say.

Why do I love this series so much?! I’m a huge fan of Doyle’s classic Sherlock Holmes stories–I grew up reading them. As such, I usually hate movie/TV versions of the stories since they almost always get important stuff wrong. Sherlock gets it right. Rather than trying to re-create a Victorian setting and Victorian characters while still making it interesting for a modern audience, the creators immediately scrap all that and go for a modern London setting. Instead of trying to pull details from the classic stories, they pull feelings, ideas, and inspiration. So it feels right–but also fresh and exciting. The plots are intriguing, and I really love they use of hour-and-a-half episodes to allow a full development of individual plots within the episode. Steven Moffat’s touch on the show is pretty evident, which I (as a big Doctor Who fan) really love–you’ve almost got a Doctor-Companion dynamic going between Sherlock and John, and it works beautifully. The characters and the character dynamics are spot-on perfect–very, very fun to watch. Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock is brilliant, absolutely brilliant. But I really think Martin Freeman as Dr. John Watson is the heart of the show, the one who makes you really care. And the interactions between the two . . . priceless. The other characters/cast members are brilliant as well, from those who show in nearly every episode (like Mrs. Hudson & DI Greg Lestrade) to Sherlock’s nemesis Moriarty to those who only show up briefly in one episode. I loved the camera angles, the production, and the creative use of screen text to show Sherlock’s though processes. All around, Sherlock is just brilliant–highly recommended!

Created by  Mark Gatiss & Steven Moffat/Written by  Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat, & Stephen Thompson/Starring Benedict Cumberbatch & Martin Freeman/Based on the stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Note: Currently this series is ongoing, with three (3-episode) seasons and one special currently available.

Update 02/12/2017: I just finished watching the fourth season (which brings the series up to a whole 13 episodes. Yay! I definitely enjoyed this season and found it to be in keeping with the previous seasons in most regards. There were definitely some surprises though, and I found the almost surreal quality of the episodes to be unique and intriguing–difficult to follow sometimes though. I’ll be interested to see if a fifth season comes to be; the end of this season almost felt like a good-bye, but I haven’t heard an official announcement that the series is completed. We’ll see, I guess.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Media Review

Gosick

gosick 1Author: Kazuki Sakuraba

Illustrator: Hinata Takeda

My rating: 4 of 5

Gosick (light novel), vol. 1

Japanese transfer student Kazaya Kujo recently began attending Saint Marguerite Academy, nestled at the foot of the Alps, in the small country of Sauville. Saint Marguerite is a breeding grounds for rumors, such as the Black Reaper who comes in the spring (a rumor quickly attached to poor Kazaya), the ship that sank 10 years ago but comes  back to the surface occasionally to lure others to the ocean depths . . . and the mysterious extra student who never comes to class. However, some of these rumors may be more than that, as Kazaya well knows. He already frequently climbs the maze of staircases in the academy’s vast library to find said extra student–a living doll who spends her days in the arboretum at the top of the library. This living doll, Victorique, quickly belies her tiny stature, cascading golden hair, and huge green eyes, however, by her pipe smoking, her incredible rate of reading . . . and her penchant for solving seemingly impossible mysteries through logical reasoning. When Kazaya and Victorique become accidentally involved in a macabre re-enactment of a fortune-telling experiment from 10 years before, Victorique’s brains and Kazaya’s bravery may be the only things standing between them and a watery grave.

Gosick is a brilliant re-envisioning of the Sherlock Holmes concept. Of course, seeing someone reason out what seems impossible to deduce in clear steps is always fascinating, and Sakuraba pulls this off smoothly. The historical setting of Europe in 1924 is also convincing–the atmosphere is just what I would expect from a country on the border of France and Switzerland during this time period. However, the key to this story’s appeal is the characters, particularly Victorique. She is exceedingly well crafted–unexpected, charming, delicate, brilliant, demanding, and enigmatic all combined. My one complaint when reading this was that some words in the translation are confused with their homonyms–for instance, the translator uses “hollow” when intending “hallow”–however, this is a minor problem, and the translation over all is quite acceptable. Gosick is definitely a recommended read, particularly for those who enjoy Doyle’s writing.

1 Comment

Filed under Book Review