Tag Archives: seasonal

My Bloody Valentine (2009 Movie)

Lionsgate

My rating: 3 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience/Rated R for all the reasons–sex, language, nudity, blood and gore, violence, you name it, you’ve been warned

Tom Warden returns to the small mining town of Harmony after nearly ten years away to settle things following his father’s death. But it seems the past is coming back to haunt him as a series of violent murders sweeps across the rural community . . . murders that parallel closely those that devastated the town on Valentine’s Day ten years ago. And people can’t help but wonder, since Tom was in a way responsible for the previous murders, or at least for the mining accident that created the monster responsible for them.

My Bloody Valentine is a great reminder of why I don’t watch slasher films–but I couldn’t resist the awesomeness that is Jensen Ackles anymore, I just couldn’t. And I have to say that if this were my kind of movie, I would likely have given it quite a high rating. There’s more story to it that just a random collection of bodies building up, so points for that. The casting and acting are well done, too–and yes, I have to gush a bit over the great job Jensen did with this role. There’s a lot of subtlety and suggestion that goes into this part, and he pulls it off with his typical aplomb. But I have to say that the other actors did a great job with their parts, too, which again made the whole thing much more enjoyable. Having said that, there’s a lot of violence and just cringe-worthy, graphic murders–kudos on the CG, by the way–that are just kind of awful, even though they’re executed well. So yeah, fair warning and all that; this is likely to induce nightmares. I did enjoy the twist at the ending, even if it was a bit predictable. Of note, this is a remake of the 1981 movie of the same title, which I haven’t seen, so I can’t comment on any comparisons between the two. Recommended for Ackles fans and for slasher fans, but probably not otherwise. And I’ll always love Ten Inch Hero waaaaay more.

Directed by Patrick Lussier/Produced by Jack L. Murray/Screenplay by Zane Smith, Todd Farmer, & John Beaird (1981 screenplay)/Story by Stephen Miller (1981 story)/Based on My Bloody Valentine by George Mihalka/Starring Jensen Ackles, Jaime King, Kerr Smith, Betsy Rue, & Kevin Tighe/Music by Michael Wandmacher

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Secret Santa (Miraculous Ladybug Fanfic)

Author: TheLastPilot

AO3 ID: 5386433/FanFiction ID: 11644460

Status: Complete (7 Chapters)

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Talk about good luck! Marinette draws Adrien’s name for their class’s Secret Santa exchange, giving her the perfect opportunity to give him the handmade coat she’s been designing just for him–with no excuse to back out in stammering embarrassment. Little does she know that he’s drawn her name and is putting a lot of thought into getting the perfect, thoughtful gift for her too. Gifts exchanged lead to more conversation, plans to hang out, and Marinette’s realization that for all the glamour of Adrien’s rich-kid/model life, he’s actually pretty lonely, especially when his other friends leave town for the holidays. Marinette’s not about to have that, so she pushes her (huge) crush on him down and determines to give him the happy family holiday he’s never had.

I know, I know, this is totally out of season, but this adorable story was too utterly sweet to not post about, regardless of the season. TheLastPilot is probably one of my absolute favorite Miraculous Ladybug fanfic writers because the tone is spot on (pun only slightly intended), the plots are thoughtful and well-planned, and the characters are the best, most enjoyable versions of themselves. Secret Santa is a great example of just that. It’s mostly this sweet (like, watch out for cavities, seriously), adorable friendship-to-maybe-more fluffy story with a big emphasis on the friendship. Marinette and Adrien’s awkward but growing friendship is really fun to read, especially with the way they esteem each other’s alter-ego without knowing their true identity woven into their interactions. And yeah, we do get a great reveal eventually. But there’s a lot of these two just being teenagers, too–shopping, playing video games, hanging out with Marinette’s parents (who are also awesome)–and that is lots of fun. The sense of humor that pervades this story is just perfect, balanced with just enough angst (mostly stemming from the notorious Gabriel Agreste) to balance it out and make the happy parts all the sweeter. Secret Santa is definitely recommended, regardless of the season.

NOTE: You can find Secret Santa at https://archiveofourown.org/works/5386433/chapters/12440687 or at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11644460/1/Secret-Santa.

 

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Psych: The Movie (2017)

USA Network

Sequel to Psych

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Shawn and Gus have properly settled in to life in San Francisco (having been there for three years already). They’ve opened a new office in Chinatown, which Shawn has cleverly (in his own opinion) named psychphrancisco. Yeah, not the most successful psychic detective agency ever, but whatever; Gus has a full-time job to help support their rent and such when they don’t have cases. Oh yeah, and Shawn and Juliet still aren’t married . . . which may actually have something to do with why Shawn is snooping around shady areas of town wearing Gus’s Hagrid costume. Looking for a stolen ring perhaps? But it quickly becomes clear that the gang have more important (or at least more immediate) issues to handle when Juliet becomes the target of a mystery killer–one that will require all their combined skills to bring to justice.

The best way to describe Psych: The Movie is that it’s an extended episode of the show. So if you like the show, you’ll probably like the movie and vice versa. I have to say, it’s fun to see the gang back together again. The Shawn/Gus dynamic is going strong. I honestly think they sat down and figured out how they could cram as many of the classic running gags for the series into one episode as possible–and include some new plays off the old bits as well. As such, the movie is funny. Very funny in a goofy Psych kind of way. And did I mention random? Because it’s definitely random, right from the get go. On the negative side, I really, really wish we had gotten more of Lassiter than a video call offering support. I miss having him be a part of the gang–if for no other reason than that no one else is as good at picking on Shawn. But we did get a good cast, including Shawn, Gus, Jules, Chief Vick, Shawn’s dad, and (randomly but welcomely) Woody. The villains were kind of annoying more than actually menacing (other than the whole kidnapping thing), and the main plot didn’t really stand out to me. But let’s be honest, how many of us watch Psych for the plot, anyhow? We do get some cute Shules action here–including some resolution to the end of the TV series. Yay! So yeah, basically if you like the show, I would recommend the movie.

Written by Steve Franks & James Roday/Directed by Steve Franks/Starring James Roday, Dulé Hill, Timothy Omundson, Maggie Lawson, Kirsten Nelson, & Corbin Bernsen

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Rise of the Guardians (2012 Movie)

DreamWorks Animation

My rating: 4 of 5

The first memory Jack Frost has is of the Man in the Moon telling him his name . . . and nothing else. Left with no direction, and quickly finding that no one can see or hear him, he becomes something of a drifter. Not that that stops him from enjoying himself. Hundreds of years later, Jack is still getting up to mischief and bringing snow for kids to enjoy, even if they can’t appreciate that it’s he who is causing it. So, being neither the responsible nor the recognized sort, Jack’s calling by the Man in the Moon to be a guardian–a protector of the hopes and happiness of children everywhere–is a huge surprise to everyone including the current guardians. And Jack certainly does give Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, and the Sandman quite a time with his antics . . . but maybe that’s exactly what they and the children need, especially in a time when darkness so threatens in the form of the Bogeyman.

So, I’ve had Rise of the Guardians recommended to me a surprising number of times from some unexpected sources . . . so I thought I’d finally give it a try. And I have to say that I’m fairly impressed. Compared to other CG kids movies from this era and in this sort of vein, it stands out as being quite well done and enjoyable. It’s not that it has the greatest animation; frankly, it’s kind of dated in that regard. But the use of color in telling the story is excellent, and the character designs are much better than I’m used to seeing. Well, the characters in general are quite well done. Never thought I’d actually be interested in Santa Claus, say, or the Easter Bunny as characters in a story, but the creators do a great job of fleshing them out, giving them interesting personalities–like making the bunny a huge, tattooed rabbit with an Aussie accent and boomerangs! Jack is, without a doubt, the best of this movie, though. His personality is such a great mix of the brash confidence of Captain Kirk mixed with the uncertainty and the sense of fun of Merlin–all of which comes through so brilliantly in his voice, facial expressions, body language, everything. Casting Chris Pine for his character was a stroke of genius, and I feel like Jack’s expressions frequently mimic those I’ve seen on Pine’s face in his role as Kirk, which is both amusing and fabulous. The plot is not the most original in the world, but it’s done in an engaging way, letting the characters’ personalities do a lot to direct the flow of the story. And they do manage to both make it a kid-appropriate (though definitely PG) story and one that can hold interest for adults as well–without all the crude jokes that so ridiculously and obnoxiously permeate the majority of kids’ movies today. I enjoyed Rise of the Guardians more than I expected to and would recommend it to others.

Directed by Peter Ramsey/Produced by Christina Steinberg & Nancy Bernstein/Screenplay by David Lindsay-Abaire/Based on The Guardians of Childhood by William Joyce/Music by Alexandre Desplat/Starring Chris Pine, Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Isla Fisher, & Jude Law

 

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A Christmas Prince (2017 Movie)

Netflix & Motion Picture Corporation of America

My rating: 3 of 5

In the search for her first big scoop, fledgling reporter Amber Moore (and does anyone else find it hilarious that her last name is still Moore here?!) travels to the small European kingdom of Aldovia to cover the coronation of Prince Richard. Or his abdication.  The prince does have a reputation as a bit of a playboy, and nobody’s really sure if he’ll step up and fill his late father’s shoes or not. Through an unexpected mix-up, Amber finds herself mistaken for Princess Emily’s new tutor, giving her unprecedented access to the royal family up close and personal. And what she finds is not at all what the rest of the press had led her to expect.

First off, I can’t believe I actually watched this; it’s exactly the sort of Hallmark-y film that I usually avoid like the plague. . . . But Rose McIver is kind of irresistible, and moreover, she actually manages to make the movie palatable.  It is very much your expected cheesy Christmas romantic drama, with loads of improbability, predictability, and sentimentality. Even the music and the camera filters used scream “classic Christmas film”–as in old, maudlin film. Yet surprisingly, I found myself liking the characters. McIver does a great job (the one thing that’s not surprising) portraying her character, drawing out the uncertainty, clumsiness, awkward curiosity, and compassion of Amber quite effectively. Ben Lamb’s portrayal of Prince Richard is more expected but still well done, and I quite enjoyed Honor Kneafsey’s work as young Princess Emily and her growing friendship with Amber. Other than that, there’s not much I can say–I enjoyed A Christmas Prince, which is more than I can say for most films of this sort, but I also found it to be pretty typical of the sentimental Christmas movie genre on the whole, for what that’s worth.

Written by Nathan Atkins/Directed by Alex Zamm/Produced by Amy Krell/Music by Zack Ryan/Starring Rose McIver, Ben Lamb,  Honor Kneafsey, Tom Knight, Sarah Douglas, Daniel Fathers, Alice Krige, & Tahirah Sharif

 

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The Nutcracker

Music by: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky/Choreography by: Melissa French, Michael French, & Adrienne Keville/Originally Choreographed by: Marius Petipa & Lev Ivanov/Performed by: NewArt School of Ballet/Featuring: Kontras Quartet

As I’m getting older, it seems that holiday traditions become just a bit more special, and what could be more traditional than The Nutcracker? In this delightful ballet, a large family gets together for Christmas, and the daughter of the house is given a nutcracker–the odd soldierly type–as a gift. During the night, she awakes–or seems to–and is waltzed through a journey in which her nutcracker turns into a charming prince, mice attack in droves, and a very sweet court performs for her enjoyment. Altogether, a very credible dream for a little girl to have during the holidays following an overly exciting day.

This past weekend, I had the opportunity to see The Nutcracker performed by our local ballet–the first time I’ve gotten to see it live. I really enjoyed it! The music and snippets of the ballet itself have always permeated the Christmas season, but it wasn’t until I saw the story in its whole that I realized how very seasonally appropriate it actually is. The story is simple, festive, and cute–I enjoyed how much of the story is devoted to what appears to be the girl’s dream. I think the manner in which it was performed when I saw it brought across that atmosphere quite effectively. The choreography was both lovely and fun–lots of big group scenes and intricately interwoven dances, which were neat. And of course, Tchaikovsky’s compositions are always grand and gorgeous, expressive, imaginative, and beautiful. I thought it was interesting that the NewArt School chose to combine recorded tracks with the live performance of the Kontras Quartet; it was surprisingly effective, and the live music was a very nice touch. I would definitely recommend going to see The Nutcracker performed live if you get a chance; it really does add a special touch to the holidays.

 

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My Life as Reindeer Roadkill

Author: Bill Myers

In a dream, Wally McDoogle is invited by a snazzy-dressing angel to a birthday party . . . for Jesus! When he wakes up, Wally does what he does best: fluster and bumble about causing mass chaos and maximum disaster. Unsure if the dream was for real, but unwilling to take the chance, Wally sets out to find the perfect gift . . . with a little help from his two best friends, Wall Street and Opera. Outcome: Mayhem, check. Perfect gift, not so much.

In the spirit of the season, I’m featuring a Christmas story this time. Not exactly your typical heartwarming, tear-jerking sort of story though. Although you may cry–from laughing too hard. As with all of Wally’s stories, My Life as Reindeer Roadkill is filled with hyperbolic humor, chaos, blunder . . . and a cool nugget of truth, ’cause y’know, you’ve got to have some sort of balance, right? This particular volume is a bit more direct (and blatantly Christian) about the message than some of the series, yet it still avoids being didactic or annoying about it. This story is particularly recommended for middle-school guys with a strong sense of humor, but also for anyone in need of a laugh over the chaos we make of the holidays–because the McDoogle family has it worse than you do!

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