Tag Archives: science fiction

Double Deal Alert: Super Nebula Author Showcase 2018 Humble Bundle & Humble Store Spring Sale

In honor of the upcoming 2018 Nebula Awards, Humble Bundle is offering a rather brilliant selection of fabulous (including numerous award-winning) titles in speculative fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. We’ve got previous Nebula winners, Hugo Award winners, Philip K. Dick Award winners, and World Fantasy Award winners. There are a few repeats from previous humble bundles, yes, but there are a lot more titles that I haven’t seen featured here before, including a couple of Jane Yolen novels I’ve been planning to get which, personally, make the bundle worth it in their own right. If you’re interested, you can find out more here.

In other news, Humble Store is having their big spring sale, which means lots of great games at deep discounts. Seriously, some of this stuff is up to 90% off right now. I found Hakuouki: Kyoto Winds for $8.99! Plus, there are some free games thrown in if you spend certain amounts. Again, if interested, check out the Humble Store at https://www.humblebundle.com/store.

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EXPIRED | Deal Alert: Classic Sci-Fi/Fantasy Book & Audiobook Humble Bundle

Humble Bundle is currently offering a selection of SF/Fantasy books in both e-book and audiobook formats that looks pretty interesting. Some of them are the same books; others are only offered in either book or audiobook format. Included are authors such as Bruce Coville, Tanith Lee, Tamora Pierce, Kenneth Oppel, Alfred Bester, and Robert Zelazny–as well as a really random-looking Jo Nesbø. Although I’m not much of an audiobook person myself (audio dramas are another thing entirely); however, there are some pretty great looking titles here if you do like audiobooks, including a few Tamora Pierce books and Oppel’s Starclimber. If you’re interested, you can find this bundle here.

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Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency (2016-2017 TV Series)

BBC America

Status: Complete (2 Seasons/18 Episodes)

My rating: 4 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience/rated TV-14

“Have you noticed an acceleration of strangeness in your life of late?” It’s an odd question to be coming from the man who just forced his way through the window into your flat then had the audacity to be affronted when you’re upset by his presence. And yet, for Todd Brotzman, it’s an oddly apt one as his life has abruptly gone from one of inane consistency to a flurry of strangeness, ending with himself unemployed, a person of interest in a frankly impossible murder case, and, oh yeah, with an odd man in a yellow jacket climbing through his window. And the fun is just beginning.

Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is one of those shows that is absolutely brilliant . . . as long as you have the patience to deal with the utter absurdity of it. The WTF-factor is huge here, with weird happenings and an accumulation of strange coincidences that all happen to connect somehow just piling on en masse. But the story has a way of rewarding viewers who stick around for the weirdness, bringing everything together in the end to make an odd sort of sense. The characters are well written, brilliantly cast, and quite interesting. Moreover, they’re relatable, perhaps more than most any characters in a TV show I’ve ever encountered. Seriously, they’re so utterly not pulled together, and it’s actually endearing and affirming to see them going about their lives, trying to make things work, while sometimes not having a clue and being so ridden with doubt and guilt. They’re very human in the midst of something that’s completely strange, paranormal even. Which isn’t to say that all the characters are normal–I would say that Dirk himself, as well as all the other Black Wing subjects, are extremely odd in their mannerisms and their way of interacting with the world, the whole “holistic” leaf-on-the-wind thing. But they make for fabulous characters. I feel like the filming is visually rewarding as well–case in point the very beginning of the first season, where we go from close-ups of Dirk’s face (too close to actually identify him immediately) to an impossibly violent and improbably crime scene to a kitten in rapid progression. Or the beginning of the second season, where we are confronted with a fantasy setting, complete with a pink-haired prince and giant scissors wielded as swords (I was almost convinced this was a preview for another show at first, it was so strange!). Seriously, though, Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is one of those shows that definitely isn’t for everyone, but if you’re willing to be patient with the weirdness, it’s oddly rewarding.

Created by Max Landis/Based on Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
by Douglas Adams/Starring Samuel Barnett, Elijah Wood, Hannah Marks, Fiona Dourif, Jade Eshete, Mpho Koaho, Michael Eklund, Dustin Milligan, Osiric Chau/Music by Cristobal Tapia de Veer & The Newton Brothers

 

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EXPIRED | Deal Alert: Angry Robot SF and Fantasy Humble Bundle

Humble Bundle is offering a selection of books from Angry Robot, featuring a variety of science fiction and fantasy titles. Personally, I’m not familiar with any of the stories of the authors, although I have at least seen The Lives of Tao (included in this bundle) around. Regardless of my familiarity, these titles appear to be different enough to be interesting, if only for the sake of variety and novelty, and thus may be worth checking out. Several of them appear to be paranormal or steampunk mysteries of one sort or another, which could be quite enjoyable.

If you’re interested, you can find this bundle at https://www.humblebundle.com/books/sf-fantasy-angry-robot-books?hmb_source=receipt_page&hmb_medium=product_tile&hmb_campaign=mosaic_section_1_layout_index_2_layout_type_threes_tile_index_2.

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Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales

Author: Justin Richards

Illustrator: David Wardle

My rating: 3 of 5

Time Lords tell their own fairy stories, didn’t you know? For instance, have you ever heard the tale of the Three Little Sontarans? Or the story of the twins who were marooned in a forest on another planet? Or about Snow White and how she saved the world from the Doomsday machine? What about Andiba and her run-in with the Four Slitheen? But however strange they may sound at first, they still begin “Once upon a time.”

Time Lord Fairy Tales was . . . not quite what I was expecting, but a fun read nevertheless. It is primarily (perhaps exclusively, and I just don’t know all the base stories) retellings of classic fairy tales but with beings and settings from the Doctor Who universe–like Sontarans and spaceships. The Doctor himself appears at times, on the fringes of the stories, although he is never a central character to the tales. I have to admit, I’m impressed with how well the stories are crafted, the way that the classic tales are reworked in a way that makes sense, carries the flavor of the original story, and yet is fresh as well. The feel of these stories is less retelling and more actual, traditional fairy tale. That’s probably the main reason that I can’t rate this higher just based on personal enjoyment–I adore retellings, but the writing style of traditional fairy tales is much more difficult for me to get excited about. Probably my favorite story is the first, a tale of children climbing a garden wall and finding plates of cookies left for them–suffice it to say that an impossible time loop and weeping angels are involved, making for a tale that is both eerie and poignant. I would have to say that I recommend Time Lord Fairy Tales for that relatively narrow group of people who love both Doctor Who and traditional fairy tales; it will be greatly enjoyed by those individuals and pretty much lost on basically anyone else.

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Landscape with Invisible Hand

Author: M. T. Anderson

My rating: 5 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience (for language and dark themes, but mostly for language)

Young artist Adam Costello and his family remember a time when things were different. But it seems like a long time ago, now. Since the vuvv made first contact, bringing promises of new technology and wealth, well, everything has changed–and not for the better. Sure, the ultra-wealthy who live in close contact with the vuvv may have a pretty comfortable life. But for everyone else, the coming of the vuvv has meant nothing but hardship: economic collapse, no jobs, looting, costs of medicine going through the roof. Everyone is forced to make tough choices, and Adam chronicles it all in paint, watercolor, and VR rendering.

On the one hand, I’m not surprised that Landscape with Invisible Hand hasn’t made a big splash in the YA community or in the literary community as a whole. (I hadn’t even heard of it until I stumbled on it in the library, and the average Goodreads rating is only 3.59.) Because while this is a solid dystopian novel (novella, whatever), it’s hitting towards the end of that genre’s popularity storm and the type of dystopian is just enough off from the mainstream that it’s not going to fly so well. Plus, it’s not all mushy romance and fighting the invading hordes. It’s dark and depressing at times. . . . Which brings me to why, on the other hand, I’m shocked that this book hasn’t taken the literary world by storm. Other than the obvious–this is an M. T. Anderson book, people! Why is it not getting attention?! But back to my point: this book is one of the most intentionally, incredibly artistic books I have read in a long time. It delves into the darkness and reveals the underlying truths . . . and finds the spark of hope in it all. The topics it handles–while couched in terms of an alien invasion–are incredibly timely for readers today, at times painfully so. Not to mention that the writing itself, the actual choice and arrangement of the words, is remarkable. It’s all present tense, sparse, yet artistic, each word carefully chosen that–were it not for the obvious paragraph structure–I might almost have thought I was reading free-verse poetry; it has that sort of feel to it. Even the book design feeds into the whole artistic structure of the whole–the unusual proportions, the cover that looks like an oil painting on canvas, the way each chapter is outlined and titled by the picture Adam is working on at that time. I get that it’s not for everyone, but I would really recommend giving Landscape with Invisible Hand a try, even if the initial premise doesn’t sound so interesting. Because this reach of this story goes far beyond what it promises on the surface.

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EXPIRED | Deal Alert: A Galaxy of Stars Humble Bundle

For anyone who’s interested, Humble Bundle currently has a collection of sci-fi and fantasy novels available in one of their bundles. Probably the most enticing part of this set for myself is all five of Patricia Wrede’s Lyra books, none of which I’ve had a chance to read before. Other highlights include Ursula Le Guin’s Changing Planes and Octavia Butler’s Seed to Harvest series, although there are several other stories that, while I am unfamiliar or only marginally familiar with the authors, look quite fascinating.

If you’re interested, you can find this bundle at https://www.humblebundle.com/books/galaxy-of-stars-books.

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