Tag Archives: reincarnation

The Betrayal Knows My Name (manga)

Mangaka: Hotaru Odagiri/Translator: Melissa Tanaka

Status: Ongoing (7 volumes, although the first 5 are 2-volume omnibus editions, so really more like 12 volumes)

My rating: 5 of 5

Growing up in an orphanage, believing his parents didn’t want him, Yuki struggles to find meaning in his existence. Yet even in the midst of his pain, he brings kindness and healing to those around him, perhaps even more so as he begins to develop the ability to see a person’s emotions and past when he comes into physical contact with them . . . although not everyone takes his kind intentions well. But as Yuki’s strange ability grows stronger and other odd things being to happen around him, he encounters a beautiful, silver-eyed man calling himself Zess who seems oddly familiar. Then another beautiful man comes to the orphanage claiming to be Yuki’s long-lost older brother. Not only that, but Yuki actually has a large extended family, all of whom are delighted to meet him, and Zess is somehow connected to them all as well. But all is not well for this family as they find themselves trapped in a centuries long war against dark and evil forces, being endlessly reincarnated to fight over and over again. And Yuki himself is a pivotal figure in this was, the reincarnation of their princess, bringing healing and hope to them all . . . if only he could figure out why he doesn’t remember anything about his previous lives. All he wants to do is bring an end to this war and to the hurt felt by these people he has quickly come to love.

Love this manga soooo much! If you can imagine a mashup of Fruits Basket and Black Butler, you probably have a pretty good idea of what The Betrayal Knows My Name is like. You’ve got the gorgeous art (and people), demon contracts, and mystery/fight aspects that you find in Kuroshitsuji. Then you’ve got the super air-headed and kind MC, the oversized cast, the reincarnation aspect, and the dark family history themes that you find in Furuba. Not necessarily an expected combination, but it works. It’s beautiful and heartbreaking and mysterious–but there’s a nice mix of cutesy slice-of-life segments filled with sweetness and humor as well. The cast is huuuuge, so it is admittedly hard to keep track of everyone at first, but as you get to know the characters, they become not only unmistakable but beloved. It’s rare for me to find a story in which I love so many of the characters so very much, which is one of the primary reasons that I give this a full five-star rating. As for the plot, there’s currently a lot of mystery and unknowns that could go in a lot of directions, so I’m curious to see whether it ends up some huge shounen-style fight or a hug-it-out shoujo conclusion or something else altogether. (I’m hankering for a very sappily sweet shoujo ending myself, but I’ll be thrilled just to see this story finished, whatever the conclusion. It’s been on hiatus for 4 years, and I had given up hope that it would every be continued. Soooo . . . happy dance that the mangaka has picked this series up again!) Fair warning that the mangaka is fairly well known for writing yaoi stories, but also firm clarification that this particular manga is not yaoi at all–it sits on the verge between shoujo and josei with aspects of shounen and a mild shounen ai flavor, but it never goes beyond that. So honestly, The Betrayal Knows My Name is generally appropriate–and highly recommended–for any T+ audience. Love it and looking forward to reading the rest!

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Homecoming (Merlin Fanfic)

Author: M1ssUnd3rst4nd1ng

FanFiction ID: 12511761

Status: Ongoing (2 Chapters)

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Arthur can think of about a million things he’d rather be doing than wandering through some dusty museum looking at boring old paintings. But if it makes his girlfriend Gwen happy and means he gets to spend time with her . . . so be it. Surprisingly, when they arrive at the painting she so wants to show him, Arthur finds himself strangely moved–both because the emotion of the moment bleeds through so vividly and because the couple depicted in this picture could easily be Gwen and Arthur themselves. So, being the spoiled, rich prat that he is, Arthur begins a search for the owner of the painting in the hopes of purchasing it as a gift for his girlfriend, only to have a most unusual encounter with the owner of the Balinor estate, a crotchety old man who seems quite taken aback by Arthur’s unexpected arrival at his doorstep.

I’ve probably said this before, but I have a special place in my affections for Merlin reincarnation stories, which is exactly what Homecoming is. The ending of the series broke me, and I find that reincarnation fics do a lot to fix that brokenness. This particular story is done rather differently from most I’ve read, and I really loved the way the author approached the whole situation. It is, in fact, poignant–a term highlighted in the story, but which applies to the fic itself just as well. It was touching and made me cry happy, moved tears. I really loved the sweet Arwen (Arthur and Gwen) dynamic to the story; the modern-day relationship was credible and fit the characters well. And I loved that all three characters (yes, Merlin too, obviously) are true to themselves. Merlin’s reactions to Arthur are great; that whole reunion was quite amusing. (Of course, old Merlin is just fabulous, wherever he shows up!) And the author’s choice to not have Arthur just remember created an interesting tension and, again, poignancy to the whole situation that I appreciated, even if it didn’t bring the thorough resolution that I may have initially expected. Also interesting was the author’s development of how Merlin spent his time in the interim between Arthur’s death and their reunion; it’s always fascinating to see what different people think about that. I found Homecoming to be a touching, but also funny, reincarnation story, and while I honestly wanted more, I think that where the author chose to leave the story is also valid and appealingly open-ended–which is not to say that I wouldn’t be thrilled if more chapters were to be released at a later date! Definitely recommended to Merlin fans, especially those broken by Camlann (and let’s face it, that’s all of us, right?).

Note: You can find Homecoming at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/12511761/1/Homecoming.

Update 09/19/2017: Upon PMing with the author, I was informed that this story is NOT in fact complete yet, and more chapters are on the way. Yay!

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Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon (manga)

Mangaka: Naoko Takeuchisailor-moon

Translator: William Flanagan

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Usagi Tsukino is an average middle-school girl–cute, cheerful, and prone to oversleeping. She’s also the reincarnation of an ancient Moon Princess–a Sailor Guardian wielding the power of the Legendary Silver Crystal to protect the world she loves. As she awakens to her powers, Usagi discovers other Sailor Guardians, friends from her past life who join her in the battles she faces. And they will definitely face numerous enemies in battle as those drawn to the power of the Legendary Silver Crystal for their own greedy reasons seek to take it from her.

First off, I must recognize that Sailor Moon has a certain appeal that uniquely comes from growing up with it; I have any number of friends who absolutely adore the story–all of whom first watched it on TV back in middle school. So I have to preface my review by saying that I only just read this manga recently, so I’m coming at the story from a different perspective, acknowledging that there are aspects of it that I’m just not going to appreciate in the same way. Please don’t be offended if you are one of those people who love this manga dearly. I can certainly acknowledge that is a classic–one that anyone who enjoys manga should read at least once–and that it has been highly influential not only on readers but on other mangaka over the years. I found Sailor Moon to be quite a unique story. The genre blend is something I’ve never seen before, at least not in this particular mix. While being essentially a shoujo story (with a strong mahou shojou flair, complete with the instantaneous costume changes and frou frou styles), there is a strong shounen vibe to the story as well. I found this particularly notable in the battles, both with the named attacks in the midst of the battles and with the sequence of each defeated enemy being followed by a stronger enemy. Personally, I found the enemies and their motives to be a bit bland and unoriginal. Although the character designs and the specifics changed, they were all essentially interchangeable otherwise, at least for the most part. On the other hand, the characters of the Sailor Guardians were charming, distinct, and interesting. I think the reason I enjoyed the series as much as I did was that I enjoyed the characters. As for the plot . . . the overarching plot of reincarnation, destined love, everlasting friendship, and all that goes into that was actually quite good. I enjoyed the time-travel plot elements that were thrown in as well. But the repeated fights just weren’t that enjoyable for me. Still, I think Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon is a solid classic manga that is well worth reading at least once, both for the characters and story themselves and to understand the innumerable references to it that pop up elsewhere.

 

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Fruits Basket

Mangaka: Natsuki Takaya

Following her mom’s death in a car accident, Tohru Honda finds herself living on her own in a tent. Not that she’s about to let any of that get her down! Shortly after setting up . . . um, house? . . . Tohru stumbles upon a large house nearby–only to find that her classmate the oh-so-popular Yuki Sohma lives there with his cousin Shigure. And, apparently, his violent, grumpy cousin Kyo. What with one thing and another, they discover her circumstances and convince her to move in and do their housekeeping (they desperately need the help!). However, it’s not long until Tohru discovers that the Sohmas are keeping a secret: when they get sick or are hugged by members of the opposite gender, several of them will turn into the various animals of the Chinese zodiac! Tohru’s more than willing to keep their secret, but the closer she gets to the Sohmas, the more she realizes there’s more to this curse than just turning into cute animals. . . . There is a deep, painful secret hiding in the Sohma family, and Tohru is desperate to free the people she loves from that painful curse, whatever it takes.

Fruits Basket is probably my absolute favorite shoujo manga ever. Maybe even my favorite manga, period. Mostly because it’s chock full of wonderful characters–again some of my absolute favorites. Momiji Sohma, for instance–super-cute and kiddish (think Honey from Hostbu), but full of surprising insights, kindnesses, and selflessness–absolutely makes my heart melt. But really, the entire cast is deep and full of surprises; they’re excellently developed and fascinating to get to know. At first glance, the plot seems veeery stereotypical shoujo–I mean seriously, death by car accident, damsel in distress moving in with a bunch of guys, random fantasy curse–but it takes those stereotypical elements as a jumping-off point for something much richer. The story is intricate and emotionally moving–few stories make me laugh and cry more, or leave a more lasting impression. I think I never really understood the concept of kindness until I read this manga; it hit home in a meaningful way to me. Regarding the art, Takaya has a distinctive style, shoujo and cute/pretty, with big, limpid eyes–in my opinion, it suits the story well. If you’re interested in a sweet, moving shoujo manga with lots of intricacies and great characters, Fruits Basket would be high on my recommendations (just be aware that it’s long–23 volumes).

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