Tag Archives: mature audience

My Bloody Valentine (2009 Movie)

Lionsgate

My rating: 3 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience/Rated R for all the reasons–sex, language, nudity, blood and gore, violence, you name it, you’ve been warned

Tom Warden returns to the small mining town of Harmony after nearly ten years away to settle things following his father’s death. But it seems the past is coming back to haunt him as a series of violent murders sweeps across the rural community . . . murders that parallel closely those that devastated the town on Valentine’s Day ten years ago. And people can’t help but wonder, since Tom was in a way responsible for the previous murders, or at least for the mining accident that created the monster responsible for them.

My Bloody Valentine is a great reminder of why I don’t watch slasher films–but I couldn’t resist the awesomeness that is Jensen Ackles anymore, I just couldn’t. And I have to say that if this were my kind of movie, I would likely have given it quite a high rating. There’s more story to it that just a random collection of bodies building up, so points for that. The casting and acting are well done, too–and yes, I have to gush a bit over the great job Jensen did with this role. There’s a lot of subtlety and suggestion that goes into this part, and he pulls it off with his typical aplomb. But I have to say that the other actors did a great job with their parts, too, which again made the whole thing much more enjoyable. Having said that, there’s a lot of violence and just cringe-worthy, graphic murders–kudos on the CG, by the way–that are just kind of awful, even though they’re executed well. So yeah, fair warning and all that; this is likely to induce nightmares. I did enjoy the twist at the ending, even if it was a bit predictable. Of note, this is a remake of the 1981 movie of the same title, which I haven’t seen, so I can’t comment on any comparisons between the two. Recommended for Ackles fans and for slasher fans, but probably not otherwise. And I’ll always love Ten Inch Hero waaaaay more.

Directed by Patrick Lussier/Produced by Jack L. Murray/Screenplay by Zane Smith, Todd Farmer, & John Beaird (1981 screenplay)/Story by Stephen Miller (1981 story)/Based on My Bloody Valentine by George Mihalka/Starring Jensen Ackles, Jaime King, Kerr Smith, Betsy Rue, & Kevin Tighe/Music by Michael Wandmacher

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Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency (2016-2017 TV Series)

BBC America

Status: Complete (2 Seasons/18 Episodes)

My rating: 4 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience/rated TV-14

“Have you noticed an acceleration of strangeness in your life of late?” It’s an odd question to be coming from the man who just forced his way through the window into your flat then had the audacity to be affronted when you’re upset by his presence. And yet, for Todd Brotzman, it’s an oddly apt one as his life has abruptly gone from one of inane consistency to a flurry of strangeness, ending with himself unemployed, a person of interest in a frankly impossible murder case, and, oh yeah, with an odd man in a yellow jacket climbing through his window. And the fun is just beginning.

Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is one of those shows that is absolutely brilliant . . . as long as you have the patience to deal with the utter absurdity of it. The WTF-factor is huge here, with weird happenings and an accumulation of strange coincidences that all happen to connect somehow just piling on en masse. But the story has a way of rewarding viewers who stick around for the weirdness, bringing everything together in the end to make an odd sort of sense. The characters are well written, brilliantly cast, and quite interesting. Moreover, they’re relatable, perhaps more than most any characters in a TV show I’ve ever encountered. Seriously, they’re so utterly not pulled together, and it’s actually endearing and affirming to see them going about their lives, trying to make things work, while sometimes not having a clue and being so ridden with doubt and guilt. They’re very human in the midst of something that’s completely strange, paranormal even. Which isn’t to say that all the characters are normal–I would say that Dirk himself, as well as all the other Black Wing subjects, are extremely odd in their mannerisms and their way of interacting with the world, the whole “holistic” leaf-on-the-wind thing. But they make for fabulous characters. I feel like the filming is visually rewarding as well–case in point the very beginning of the first season, where we go from close-ups of Dirk’s face (too close to actually identify him immediately) to an impossibly violent and improbably crime scene to a kitten in rapid progression. Or the beginning of the second season, where we are confronted with a fantasy setting, complete with a pink-haired prince and giant scissors wielded as swords (I was almost convinced this was a preview for another show at first, it was so strange!). Seriously, though, Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is one of those shows that definitely isn’t for everyone, but if you’re willing to be patient with the weirdness, it’s oddly rewarding.

Created by Max Landis/Based on Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
by Douglas Adams/Starring Samuel Barnett, Elijah Wood, Hannah Marks, Fiona Dourif, Jade Eshete, Mpho Koaho, Michael Eklund, Dustin Milligan, Osiric Chau/Music by Cristobal Tapia de Veer & The Newton Brothers

 

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Bloodsucking Bastards (2015 Movie)

Shout! Factory

My rating: 2 of 5

WARNING: MATURE AUDIENCE/Not rated, but would be rated R for language and blood and gore

Live in corporate America is completely unfair. You really try to do your job, and on the one hand your best friend who works with you thinks you’re lame for trying so hard, while on the other your boss overlooks you for your expected promotion–only to high your college nemesis from outside the company instead! Evan finds it all a bit too much, especially when his girlfriend Amanda (who works in HR) is currently shunning his as well (although it really was his fault). But really, finding out that the new company strategy is to turn its workers into vampires?! Truly unfair, and also a bit disturbing.

So . . . picked this up because Fran Kranz. Adorable and fun actor to watch, although this certainly isn’t his best movie. Basically, take The Office and add vampires, and you’ve got the basic plot of Bloodsucking Bastards. I honestly almost didn’t finish this; the first chunk is kind of boring, full of corporate politics, love problems, and bad/awkward comedy à la The Office. But once the action starts–people acting strange, bodies showing up, that sort of thing–the story becomes more interesting, although still full of awkward comedic moments and lots of language (fair warning). There are elements of the story that are clever in an indie-writing sort of way, I guess. Kranz comes into his own as things heat up, showing that he is capable of making even a rather awful movie into something at least somewhat interesting. Still not my favorite role for him, though. Also, fair warning that the vampires in this movie splat something awful–blood and gore everywhere in a goopy, but not really graphic, kind of way. I think . . . if you’re into horror-comedy and enjoy a poke at corporate politics, Bloodsucking Bastards might be fun, but it’s generally not something I’d recommend on the whole.

Written by Ryan Mitts & Dr. God/Directed by Brian James O’Connell/Produced by Brett Forbes, Patrick Rizzotti, Brandon Evans, Colleen Hard, & Justin Ware/Starring Fran Kranz, Pedro Pascal, Emma Fitzpatrick, Joey Kern, Joel Murray, Justin Ware, & Marshall Givens/Music by Anton Sanko

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Lost Boys

Author: Orson Scott Card

My rating: 5 of 5

Warning: Mature audience; also, 1) this book made me cry more than I have since Grave of the Fireflies, and 2) kids do get hurt here–it’s dealt with as the heinous, awful thing that it is, but it still happens, so worried moms might not want to read this if they want to sleep at night.

In 1983, Step and Deanne Fletcher move their growing family to the small town of Steuben, North Carolina, for Step to start a promising new job for the growing computer company Eight Bits, Inc. But right from the start, things seem to go wrong. Step’s new job turns out to be nothing like what he’d expected, being relegated to writing program manuals and being told to sneak around behind his immediate supervisor’s back, even though he had great success in the past as a programmer himself. Deanne’s pregnancy makes her constantly sick, adding to the burdens of caring for their three young children. Their oldest, eight-year-old Stevie is becoming withdrawn, spending his time talking to imaginary friends. The house they’re renting seems beset by plagues of insects. And little boys in the area have started disappearing, presumed kidnapped and murdered. But in the midst of all their stress and worry, the Fletchers are determined to not quit, throwing themselves into serving in their new church ward, parenting their children, and generally doing their best with the situation they are given, however difficult it may be to trust all will be well in time.

Lost Boys was an unusual and unexpected book. The only other think by Card that I’ve read is Ender’s Game, and this book is nothing like that. The majority of this story is just this story about this Mormon family and their lives–the most innocuous, simple thing imaginable. And Card does that aspect of the story well, giving us a deep, developed view of Step, Deanne, and Stevie in particular, as well as of their other kids, Robbie, Betsy, and later Zap. The pacing is slow, leisurely, giving us time to get into these people’s day-to-day existence, sharing in their concerns and their little joys and victories, feeling how much their faith and family bolster them. And you know what? I really came to like these people; they’re good people, doing their best to do what’s right, to protect each other, to love others and be compassionate. But underneath this innocuous slice-of-life story, you’ve got this constant undercurrent of something deeper and darker and possibly supernatural going on. It reminds me of some of Stephen King’s books, the way the tension lies just under the surface. There’s a slow, certain inevitability to the plot development in this regard that makes the ending (which I won’t spoil) an expected conclusion by that point–which makes it no less a tear jerker, but it’s kind of cathartic as well. Peaceful, strangely enough. In any case, Lost Boys was a story that struck a deep chord with me and that I would highly recommend, if you have the patience for the slow development.

 

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Landscape with Invisible Hand

Author: M. T. Anderson

My rating: 5 of 5

Warning: Mature Audience (for language and dark themes, but mostly for language)

Young artist Adam Costello and his family remember a time when things were different. But it seems like a long time ago, now. Since the vuvv made first contact, bringing promises of new technology and wealth, well, everything has changed–and not for the better. Sure, the ultra-wealthy who live in close contact with the vuvv may have a pretty comfortable life. But for everyone else, the coming of the vuvv has meant nothing but hardship: economic collapse, no jobs, looting, costs of medicine going through the roof. Everyone is forced to make tough choices, and Adam chronicles it all in paint, watercolor, and VR rendering.

On the one hand, I’m not surprised that Landscape with Invisible Hand hasn’t made a big splash in the YA community or in the literary community as a whole. (I hadn’t even heard of it until I stumbled on it in the library, and the average Goodreads rating is only 3.59.) Because while this is a solid dystopian novel (novella, whatever), it’s hitting towards the end of that genre’s popularity storm and the type of dystopian is just enough off from the mainstream that it’s not going to fly so well. Plus, it’s not all mushy romance and fighting the invading hordes. It’s dark and depressing at times. . . . Which brings me to why, on the other hand, I’m shocked that this book hasn’t taken the literary world by storm. Other than the obvious–this is an M. T. Anderson book, people! Why is it not getting attention?! But back to my point: this book is one of the most intentionally, incredibly artistic books I have read in a long time. It delves into the darkness and reveals the underlying truths . . . and finds the spark of hope in it all. The topics it handles–while couched in terms of an alien invasion–are incredibly timely for readers today, at times painfully so. Not to mention that the writing itself, the actual choice and arrangement of the words, is remarkable. It’s all present tense, sparse, yet artistic, each word carefully chosen that–were it not for the obvious paragraph structure–I might almost have thought I was reading free-verse poetry; it has that sort of feel to it. Even the book design feeds into the whole artistic structure of the whole–the unusual proportions, the cover that looks like an oil painting on canvas, the way each chapter is outlined and titled by the picture Adam is working on at that time. I get that it’s not for everyone, but I would really recommend giving Landscape with Invisible Hand a try, even if the initial premise doesn’t sound so interesting. Because this reach of this story goes far beyond what it promises on the surface.

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Fables & Reflections (Graphic Novel)

Author: Neil Gaiman

The Sandman, vol. 6

My rating: 5 of 5

WARNING: Mature Audience

Late one night, a blooming artist faces his deepest fears. In September of 1859, a man writes to the paper declaring himself emperor of the United States. For one day out of the year, Caesar leaves his position and takes to the streets, disguised as a beggar, to think and plan beyond the attention of the gods. In 1273, young Marco Polo finds himself lost in a desert sandstorm, beguiled away from the path by voices–real or imagined he cannot tell. On his wedding day, the son of Morpheus of the Endless will find great joy followed by great sorrow, enough to change his existence forever. And through all these stories and more, the presence of Dream weaving through their realities, touching people and altering their minds and hearts–as is the wont of dreams.

Fables & Reflections may just be my favorite Sandman volume to date. It’s quite an eclectic collection. The first good chunk of it–several individual stories–is all essentially historical fiction, more magical realism than true fantasy, really. And I loved the way Gaiman wrote these stories, the way he wove Morpheus into these historical lives and the way he drew attention to lesser known historical figures. The story of Emperor Norton–of whom I had never heard before this–actually moved me to tears. From there, we move to what I would consider more traditional Sandman stories: a kid wandering into the Dreaming, meeting Matthew the raven, and hearing stories from Cain, Abel, and Eve; a highly stylized story of a ruler of Baghdad during its golden age; and perhaps most significantly, a retelling of the story of Orpheus spanning multiple chapters and tying him in with Dream and the Endless directly. The storytelling in all of these tales is absolutely top-notch–clear and insightful and beautifully phrased, basically everything I love about Gaiman’s writing. I also found the art in this volume to be more appealing than that which I typically find in this medium. It’s still definitely a more comic-book style, but the flow is nice, there’s a greater focus on the text (with fonts and such used to great effect), and the coloring is generally appealing; the art suits the stories well. For those who enjoy Gaiman’s writing, I would definitely recommend Fables & Reflection. It’s probably advisable to read the other volumes first, but this could probably stand on its own and be fairly easy to follow as well.

Covers & Design by Dave McKean/Illustrated by Bryan Talbot, Stan Woch, P. Russell Craig, Shawn McManus, John Watkiss, Jill Thompson, Duncan Eagleson, Kent Williams, Mark Buckingham, Vince Locke, & Dick Giordano/Colored by Danny Vozzo, Digital Chameleon, & Sherilyn Van Valkenburgh/Lettered by Todd Klein/Introduced by Gene Wolfe

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Thicker Than Water (Supernatural Fanfic)

Author: Mousme

FanFiction ID: 6266954

Status: Complete (1 Chapter)

My rating: 4 of 5

Warning: Spoilers through season 5/Mature Audience (officially rated T, but I’m pretty sure NC-17 would be more accurate)

Sam and Dean get hit with a spell that sticks them in each other’s body, but it’s only supposed to last a couple of days, so they figure they can just ride it out. What’s the worst that could happen? At first, they’re a bit awkward getting used to the feel of a different body–and the weirdness of seeing their own face looking back at them with their brother’s facial expressions. But as time passes, Dean becomes more and more aware that something is off with Sam’s body. There’s a hunger, a craving, that he just can’t place, and the big, unhealthy meals that he loves just seem to make him feel worse. . . .

Thicker Than Water was a very enjoyable and thought-provoking SPN fanfic. The premise is just fabulous–both the body-swap itself, and the use of that to force Dean to see the whole demon-blood addiction thing from Sam’s perspective. I loved how well the author wrote the whole family/bromance thing that the boys have while still highlighting their differences and being honest about how much they keep from each other. Because really. Major kudos to the author for writing a third-person, present-tense story that not only doesn’t feel stilted and awkward but actually has a great flow and feels really natural to read. It’s rare to see present tense written with any kind of skill, so I found this particularly impressive. I also liked how much the phrasings and mood of the story feel like both the show in general and Dean in particular (since it’s mostly from his perspective)–including the use of concepts like seeing one’s face in a mirror with a bitchface filter. Well written and very credibly Dean. I enjoyed Thicker Than Water a lot and look forward to reading more of the author’s work.

You can find Thicker Than Water at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/6266954/1/Thicker-Than-Water.

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