Tag Archives: interactive fiction

Choice of Robots (Text-Based Game)

Producer: Choice of Games

Author: Kevin Gold

My rating: 5 of 5

You may just be in postgraduate studies right now, crafting the initial designs for your first real robot, but you know your creations are destined for greatness. One way or the other, you’re going to impact the world. But will you be a humanitarian, training your robots to work with people and crafting them to be useful in the medical field? Or will you create robots that are useful for the military, regardless of the consequences? Or hey, your robots are intelligent enough, will you just give them their freedom and let them decide for themselves what sorts of beings they should become?

Okay, so first off, I’m hesitant to call Choice of Robots either a video game or a visual novel–but I don’t really have a good word for what it is other than those. This is an entirely text-based computer game, devoid of pictures or background music entirely. Sounds kind of boring, right? It’s totally not. This is an indie choices matter sort of game that is just fabulous, truly. It’s smart, for one thing; the writer has a Ph.D. in computer science, and it shows. It’s very well thought out and organized. The game is like a visual novel in that you read a block of text and are offered a variety of choices you can make based on that text. Your choices are meaningful, and even small choices can have a big impact on what happens later in the game. Choices also influence your stats (empathy, grace, autonomy, and military appeal for your robot, plus your own wealth and fame) as well as your relationships with various other characters. I can see this game as having a great deal of replay value due to the huge number of story paths available; I’ve played through it three times already, and have only unlocked a few of the possibilities. If you’re willing to look past the surface simplicity of such a purely text-based game, I think Choice of Robots is an excellent game, and I will be trying other games by this group.

Note: I played Choice of Robots through Steam, and you can find out more at the Steam store page or on the game’s credits page.

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Mix It Up!

Author/Illustrator: Hervé Tullet

My rating: 4 of 5

We are presented with a page, completely blank save for a solitary gray spot. Invited to tap said spot, we do and are presented with an explosion of spots of all colors. And now that we have colors to work with, we’re challenged to try combining them to see what happens when we mix it up.

Mix It Up! is certainly not the sort of picture book to which I am accustomed. It isn’t actually a story at all. I’m honestly at a loss as to how to even categorize it. It’s an interactive experience for kids presented in book format; that’s the best explanation I can come up with. A bit more complex that your usual “name the colors” book, Mix It Up! visually and experientially teaches kids color theory, what happens when you mix different colors, how to create shades and tints, that sort of thing. It’s all very vibrant and interactive–rather than didactically telling the reader what’s happening, it invites us to see and discern for ourselves. This book is great for kids that need a bit more interactivity as it asks them to tap, shake, squish, and tilt the pages as they go along; fortunately, the pages are actually sturdy enough to withstand this kind of abuse. As far as recommended age goes, I think Mix It Up! is best suited for a slightly older demographic than most picture books, although it could be pretty flexible. My two-and-a-half year-old niece enjoys the first half, but the latter parts where more inductive reasoning is required are a bit beyond her appreciation yet. I’d say around five would be the ideal age for this book, but it would depend on the kid. For any age, it’s a great introduction to color theory.

 

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Impossible Quest

Developed by Axel Sonic/Published by OtakuMaker Studioimpossible-quest

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Interested in a quirky text-based game filled with wacky humor, snark, and tons of geeky references? Impossible Quest might be just the game for you. In this choose-your-own-adventure game, you are given a text cue and must select from three possible choices to advance through the game. . . . Actually, that sounds kind of boring. If you don’t take into account the hilarity of some of your possible choices, the 100+ possible endings, the frequency of your demise, and the probability of at some point meeting zombies, Nyan Cat, or Doctor Who.

I have really enjoyed playing Impossible Quest, as weird as it may sound. It is a weird game, and it will appeal strongly to certain people while others will likely hate it–it’s just that sort of game. Still, it’s well worth a try (especially at $1.99 on Steam). It has had me laughing, dying, and repeating quite enjoyably. The dying . . . reminds me significantly of Long Live the Queen in that you die, try something different, get a bit further, and die again, having fun even while being infuriated. And the endings themselves are kind of funny in a snarky way. Hey, there are even a few endings in which you survive and escape. Also, the geekiness must be mentioned. Your initial scenarios are A) a dungeon where you may meet trolls, mermaids, and a talking walrus, B) a plane trip complete with zombies and flying cars, and C) a spaceship with most of the usual suspects for that sort of scenario present at one point or another. So yeah, geekiness in the basic setting, but also inserted wherever possible in the text options as well. Very fun!  I know Impossible Quest won’t be for everyone, but I would strongly encourage those with geeky leanings to at least give it a try.

 

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Dungeons & Dragons

So, my family just started playing D&D together. It’s a first for several of us, and it’s been an intriguing experience so far. I’ve enjoyed the way it pushes the imagination and stretches our story- and character-building skills. Plus, it provides some interesting insights into the people you’re playing with . . . as well as some amusement when they play characters that are distinctly different from their own personalities. Fun! I’m not saying roleplaying games are for everyone, but I do think this is a fun way to actively create a story with other people as you go along. And I’m all about experiencing story in all sorts of forms. It’s been a fun experience so far, and I’m looking forward to seeing where our game will go from here.

(I may also be writing this to excuse my lack of a decent book review so far this week . . . I’ve been occupied!)

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Open Me…I’m a Dog!

Open Me...I'm a Dog!Author/Illustrator:  Art Spiegelman

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This might look like a book, but in reality it’s something much more exciting: it’s a dog! Read in wonder as he convinces you of this fact, explaining how he got from being a normal dog to the book you hold. And remember, like most dogs, he just wants to be your friend.

Open Me . . . I’m a Dog! is a super-cute picture book from the renowned creator of such books as Maus. The story itself is very reader engaging–the entirety of the text is the dog talking directly to the reader, telling his story and trying to convince you. His tale is cute and fun, appropriate for kids, but I enjoyed it as an adult, too. I think the details of the book format itself are outstanding: although it’s not a pop-up book specifically, there is one page that has a pop-up for emphasis/demonstration. And the book-mark ribbon is shaped like a leash, with a loop to hold it by! I think Open Me . . . I’m a Dog! is a super-fun story for readers around 4 or 5 years old, but also for readers of all ages.

 

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