Tag Archives: humor

The Terrible Two Get Worse

Authors: Mac Barnett & Jory John

Illustrator: Kevin Cornell

The Terrible Two, vol. 2

My rating: 4 of 5

Best friends Miles Murphy and Niles Sparks, better known as the Terrible Two (but only to each other), have taken their school by storm with a series of madcap pranks. As a pair of dedicated pranksters, it’s what they do. But they realize they may have gone too far when their pranks get Principal Barkin fired . . . only to be replaced by his father, also Principal Barkin. And while their former principal made a fun target for their pranking, the new principal is quickly sucking the life and fun out of everything. He doesn’t even react, even to the most innovate pranks. And to handle this new principal and get their old one back, Miles and Niles will have to team up with an unlikely ally to pull off a prank of epic proportions.

For those who enjoyed The Terrible Two, this book is a solid, fun follow-up. The Terrible Two Get Worse is a charming, funny middle-grade story full of tricks, friendship, and good clean fun. I appreciate particularly that this volume addresses the idea of pranking while doing no real harm–and fixing the messes you make. Because yeah, while middle-grade pranking is humorous and ought to be relatively innocent, it would be pretty easy for kids to go overboard. As far as Niles and Miles’ friendship, we get something more developed and settled here. In the first volume, they’re in this rivals-to-friends stage, but by this point, they know each other and have done lots together. They accept each others’ quirks, have secret handshakes, and are generally comfortable together. I wish we had gotten more of this friendship aspect, honestly–like, it’s there throughout, but there’s enough focus on plot that it gets a smidge lost in the shuffle at times. Still, though, I enjoyed the friendship represented here. The plot can get a bit angsty at times, if only because there’s such a dour antagonist at play, but rest assured that there’s plenty of good fun as well. As an aside, I also really enjoyed the way the illustrations are worked in as actual parts of the text; you couldn’t read the story completely without the specific pictures in the specific places that they are. For those who enjoy humorous middle-grade stories, I would recommend.

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The Falcon at the Portal

Author: Elizabeth Peters

Amelia Peabody, vol. 11

My rating: 4.5 of 5

The 1911 season looks to be one full of drama for Amelia Peabody what with the weddings, the weird family drama between Nefret and Ramses, the political intrigue and drug dealers on the loose, the random child popping up claiming to belong to Ramses. And of course, the rash of forgeries attributed to Ramses’ best friend, David–falsely attributed, obviously, but proving that is being a bit challenging. Maybe it’s a good thing the only site Emerson was able to get this season is a bit boring on the whole.

I absolutely always love Peters’ Amelia Peabody books; there’s some great history combined with lots of thrills, good humor, suspense, mystery, and romance. Basically, they’re just good historical adventures all around. The Falcon at the Portal fills this excellently, although I do have to say that it’s just generally less cohesive than some of the other stories in this series. Honestly, there’s just so much going on that it’s hard to keep track sometimes of what’s actually important. Add to that the fact that you’ve got three separate narrators (even though I love having Nefret and Ramses’ perspectives), and the story can be a bit all over the place at times. But really, I feel like the actual mystery plot takes second place to the character development and drama in this volume anyhow, so it’s not such a big deal to miss plot threads at times. And wow is there some drama going on here! For one, we’ve got some actual development in one of my favorite (of all time, not just of this series) ships–Nefret and Ramses. Plus the whole mess with Amelia’s nephew Percy and the Americans who keep hanging around. And of course, this is where Sennia joins the family. So yeah, lots of drama, a good touch of heartache, but lots of fun, too. Recommended.

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Gravity Falls Don’t Color This Book!: It’s Cursed! (Gravity Falls Coloring Book)

Author: Emmy  Cicierega

Illustrator: Stephanie Ramirez

My rating: 4 of 5

When Mabel finds a blank book in Dipper’s stuff, well, he can’t really expect her to NOT write in it, can he? Only, when she opens it up and starts her Mabelish ramblings, she finds Dipper actually stuck in the book, trapped by an extradimensional being demanding they give it colors. Which, okay, for Gravity Falls is basically Tuesday, but whatever. Naturally, Mabel and Dipper are going to be completely serious and compliant with this weirdo’s wishes. Oh, who am I kidding? When are the Pines twins ever serious or compliant?!

So, technically, this is a Gravity Falls coloring book. But it’s also basically a short graphic novel, so there’s that. The Pines twins’ character is all over this book, right from the sparkly pink ink and  stickers festooning the cover. The back and forth dialogue between Mabel, Dipper, and the color-sucking monster (Chamelius Pendraggin, “pigmentologist”) is amusingly in-character and funny. The pictures get quite goofy, but they are also very funny–classic Mabel whimsy makes up a huge portion of it (and how could that be anything but awesome?) with some amusing Dipper asides and lots of commentary from Dipper on Mabel’s pictures. This is one of those books that, although it’s clearly intended for kids as a coloring book, it manages to be a fun read for fans of the show, even if they’re waaaay over the intended age bracket. Recommended.

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Egg(ing ’em on) (Young Justice Fanfic)

Author: CaptainOzone

AO3 ID: 10986921

Status: Complete (oneshot)

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Artemis is dying for a distraction from the essay she’s been fighting. But when Robin comes in wearing a dark mood that (scarily) morphs into one too bright, she’s instantly suspicious. More so when he brings up the bright idea of sneaking through the security of Wayne Manor to–wait for it–egg the place! Seriously, what is he thinking? There’s no way the team will agree . . . only, somehow Artemis finds herself doing just that. This is going to end badly.

CaptainOzone is a fabulous author, and Egg(ing ’em on) is a delightful, well-written story. The characters are in character, and we get some solid character development, particularly on the parts of Artemis and Dick. I absolutely adore their interactions. You get to see some of the darkness and hurt that lies underneath the surface of there characters. But you also get some great insight into the friendships that keep them going and the laughter and fun they have together. Secret identities will be revealed, and there are some great Batfam moments as well. Definitely recommended.

Note: You can find this fic at https://archiveofourown.org/works/10986921.

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Gravity Falls: Lost Legends (Graphic Novel)

Author: Alex Hirsch

My rating: 5 of 5

Welcome back to the weird, wonderful town of Gravity Falls for a collection of never-before-told tales! Follow Dipper and Pacifica as they go where no human has been permitted before (not that they were actually invited) in a quest to retrieve . . . Mabel’s stolen face. Or join the gang as they dive into the wonderful world of comics, breaking all genre boundaries (and the fourth wall) in search of Grunkle Stan. Watch in wonder as Mabel faces the challenges of dealing with none other than . . . herself? And enjoy a peek into the childhood adventures of the older Pines twins. Weirdest of all? The whole thing is narrated by none other than Gravity Falls’ own Shmebulock!

I enjoy this graphic novel so much! I’ve read Lost Legends three times so far, and it has yet to grow old. Because honestly? This book is basically the series, and when does that ever grow old? Seriously, these four stories are slated as tales that were just a bit too weird to make the cut for the cartoon . . . but I could totally see them being there. Not that I’m sad they ended up as a graphic novel instead, though. They’re perfect for this medium, especially the story where they go into graphic novels as part of the plot. It’s hugely fun to see the various styles on the page, going from old-school comics to manga to gritty contemporary stuff to superhero comics–plus the visual effect when they fall into the margins and cut through the pages. It’s great–probably my favorite story of this set. Throughout all four stories, we see the characters being very much themselves and in character. But we also get character growth, which is also amazing. At least two of these stories take place late in the series (one of them post-Weirdmageddon), and it shows. Pacifica begins to come into her own and make choices that aren’t totally based on her family’s approval. Mabel begins to realize how over-the-top and kind-of selfish she can be. Just generally the characters are fabulous and the stories are a lot of fun. Highly recommended to fans of the cartoon.

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The Terrible Two

Authors: Jory John & Mac Barnett

Illustrator: Kevin Cornell

The Terrible Two, vol. 1

My rating: 4.5 of 5

Miles really hates that his mom is moving them from his home near the ocean where everyone knew him as an epic prankster to some podunk Midwestern town that smells of cows . . . where no one even knows his name. Starting at his new school, he knows he’s going to have to act fast to solidify his role as an outstanding prankster before he gets stuck hanging out with the school tattle-tale suck-up, Niles. Only trouble is, this school seems to already have a resident prankster, one who seems to be two steps ahead of Miles at every turn–and one so good at hiding that the principal is convinced Miles is guilty of the pranks!

The Terrible Two is a fun, funny middle-grade story that I literally read in one sitting. It’s got great characterizations, relatable problems, and hilarious pranks. All told is a droll, matter-of-fact tone that just makes it even funnier, along with fabulous black-and-white illustrations that emphasize and elaborate on the story brilliantly. Oh, and it’s got cows. Lots and lots of cows. . . . But seriously, I really enjoyed the way the relationship between these two pranksters played out, going from annoyance and bafflement to outright antagonism and finally to this great bromantic pranking team. The Terrible Two is a lot of fun; recommended.

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The Adventure Zone: Murder on the Rockport Limited! (Graphic Novel)

Original Story by: Clint McElroy, Griffin McElroy, Justin McElroy, & Travis McElroy

Adaptation by: Clint McElroy & Carey Pietsch

My rating: 5 of 5

The Adventure Zone, vol. 2

Warning: Mature Audience, mostly for language

Adventurers Taako, Magnus, and Merle have just been recruited by a secret organization based on the moon and dedicated to protecting the world from dangerous magical artifacts. Their first mission to retrieve a magic item naturally spinwheels into mayhem, ending up on a train ride through the mountains, complete with murder, a monster crab, a kid detective, an axe-wielding pro-wrestler, and the requisite amount of snark and dirty jokes. Who knew train rides could be so perilous?

In this fabulous follow-up to Here There Be Gerblins, the McElroys once again invite us on a D&D campaign of mayhem and grand fun. This really is one of those experiences that I think would be weird to read for anyone who isn’t a D&D player, but for those of us who do play, it resonates, truly capturing the experience of playing the game once you get past all the piddly mechanical stuff. All the fun and snark of playing with people you know well, the fourth-wall breaking and present-day references, the plot’s randomly going off the rails (okay, the train is actually pretty apropos), and just the general flow of gameplay is well represented here in a way that gamers can both relate to and find highly amusing. Add to that some larger-than-life characters–the sort that would never fly in a normal fictional story but that are completely at home in something this absurd–and a fabulous graphical representation by Carey Pietsch, and you really have a fabulous, wacky, delightfully nerdy story. Highly recommended.

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