Tag Archives: Hayao Miyazaki

My Neighbor Totoro (1988 Movie)

Studio Ghibli

My rating: 5 of 5

Satsuki, her father,  and her little sister Mei move to an old, slightly decrepit house in the country to be closer to the hospital where their mother is being treated. It’s a big change, but it’s also an adventure, and both girls are delighted, especially when they find the house is inhabited by soot sprites–tiny spirits that the adults can’t even see. Even better, Mei encounters a large, friendly spirit calling himself “Totoro” during her explorations while Satsuki is at school. (Satsuki’s a tiny bit jealous about that.) But one rainy evening when the girls go out to meet their father’s bus, Satsuki gets to meet Totoro as well! It seems that not only are their new neighbors glad to welcome the family to the area; the forest spirits are as well. Good thing, too, because it will take everyone’s help when Mei goes missing.

My Neighbor Totoro is one of those movies that never gets old and that has something for everyone. My two-year-old niece adores it, and my dad does too. It’s a wonderful story for many diverse reasons. Just as a start, the animation and the music are wonderful. Joe Hisaishi has some of the most interesting and beautiful film scores out there, and the score for this movie is no exception. And yes, the art isn’t always as detailed in some scenes as the modern CG stuff that’s created today, but the form, the details that the artists choose to capture, and the overall flavor of the place and time that is evoked is absolutely stunning. The characterizations of the children–everything from the art to the scripts to all the tiny details–is incredibly captivating and believable. Satsuki is the quintessential big sister trying to hold it all together and mother her little sister while still being just a kid and worried about her mom’s health herself. And Mei is so full of whimsy and imagination and childish impulses and mannerisms. I love the way in which the culture and community of a rice-farming community in late 1950’s Japan is presented, too, with all sorts of details. And the way in which the wonders of the spirits and traditional beliefs and fantasy are all woven in is just lovely and charming. In short, My Neighbor Totoro is a sweet, lovely animated movie that I would highly recommend to basically anyone of any age.

Note: I watched the 2005 English dub for this movie. It’s excellent.

Written and Directed by Hayao Miyazaki/Produced by Toru Hara/Music by Joe Hisaishi/Starring Dakota Fanning, Elle Fanning, Tim Daly, Lea Salonga, & Frank Welker

 

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Artist Spotlight: Boomslank/P-shinobi

Website: Boomslank.com

So, I know artist spotlights aren’t something I usually post, but . . . this past weekend while I was (having a blast) at Ichibancon, I got to meet an intriguing original artist. Going by P-shinobi under the label Boomslank, this artist has a fascinating, beautiful style that pulls strongly from anime-style influences. His work is a neat blend of conceptual stuff, odd perspectives, and surrealism that, while clearly influenced by greats like Hayao Miyazaki, is also refreshingly original. The content is everything from mecha to slice-of-life to some really amazing surreal stuff like fish in the sky (which looks waaay cooler than it sounds). Plus, I love the color schemes used in these prints, especially the use of lots of neutral colors combined with splashes of brighter ones for contrast and accent. So yeah, if you like anime-style art and are interested in some more original stuff, you should check out Boomslank’s offerings.

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Legends of Zita the Spacegirl

Author/Illustrator: Ben Hatkelegends of zita the spacegirl

My rating: 5 of 5

Zita the Spacegirl, vol. 2

Being famous isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, you know? Zita quickly finds this out after she and her friends save Scriptorius. Soon her picture is plastered on walls everywhere she goes, and everywhere she is greeted by huge crowds wanting to meet her and get her autograph. Sometimes she’d really just love some time to herself, right? So when Zita encounters a robot that almost-perfectly mimics her, she decides to take advantage of the situation for a while and let this robot take her place–just long enough for her to get a break. The only trouble is that robot-Zita sees itself as the real hero, as Zita herself, and volunteers the crew to go save a planet . . . leaving the real Zita and her friend Mouse behind!

I absolutely loved the first Zita graphic novel, and I think Legends of Zita the Spacegirl is a strong follow-up, consistently portraying the things that I loved in the first volume. Zita is a strong character, and she encounters a lot of strong individuals along her journey–several of whom have a huge impact on her. I really loved the introduction of Madrigal in this volume; it’s clear she and Piper have a history, and I’m really curious to see that developed more. And I appreciated that robot-Zita, although wrong for a good part of the story, has redeeming aspects to her as well. The plot is exciting and full of adventure, but definitely ok for elementary-age kids. It even highlights important character traits like loyalty and self-sacrifice, while avoiding being “preachy” in the slightest. And I just love the art; it’s gutsy and adorable, whimsical and eclectic. Actually, it reminds me a lot of the work of Hayao Miyazaki and Kazu Kibuishi, while still having its own unique quirks that are just fantastic. I would highly recommend Legends of Zita the Spacegirl to just about anyone of any age; it’s a wonderful story!

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The Wind Rises

Studio Ghibli

Written & Directed by Hayao Miyazaki/Produced by Toshio Suzuki/Music by Joe Hisaishi

Ever since he was young, Jiro Horikoshi has dreamed of the sky and the aircraft that inhabit it so gracefully. He would have loved to be a pilot, but due to his poor eyesight, that dream would never come to pass. Realizing this early on, he takes a note from his hero, the Italian airplane designer Caproni, and pursues a career in aircraft design. A combination of innate talent and unflagging work keep him on the path, designing better and better planes, always pursuing the ideal craft that exists only in his dreams.

Over the years, I have come to expect great things from Studio Ghibli, and from Hayao Miyazaki in particular–and I must say The Wind Rises is something special indeed. It is, at its core, nearly a documentary on the life of Jiro Horikoshi, designer of the Mitsubishi A6M Zero–a plane used by Japan during the second World War. Yet Miyazaki transforms this young man’s life story into something beautiful and spectacular. Jiro deals, throughout the story, with the impossible question: would you pursue your dreams, even knowing what you create may be used in war, or would you live in a world where you abandon your dreams and refuse to create? The telling of the story itself is fascinating–you are given snapshots of various important events in the life of Horikoshi, but each is filled out in great detail, enough to give a good idea of who the characters are. I love that Miyazaki included Jiro’s brief, fateful relationship with Nahoko his beautiful, sickly wife (although I find Nahoko herself a strikingly Mamoru Hosoda sort of heroine). All the aircraft that are included only serve to emphasize that this is a Hayao Miyazaki movie–they’re kind of his trademark. The art is classic Studio Ghibli–breathtakingly beautiful. I think the inclusion of certain rather surreal elements, particularly in Jiro’s dreams, adds a lot to the story as well. I think my favorite Miyazaki movies will always be his fantasies like Spirited Away and Howl, but The Wind Rises is pretty incredible as well–you should check it out, especially if you’re a fan of Studio Ghibli or of older planes.

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Howl’s Moving Castle

Studio Ghibli

Written & Directed by Hayao Miyazaki/Produced by Toshio Suzuki/Music by Joe Hisaishi/Based on Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

The town is abuzz with talk of the war. Which naturally leads to talk of the wizards the king is dragging in to help with the war efforts. Which then leads, of course, to talk of the Wizard Howl–notable for holding out on the king, for living in a moving castle that roves the wastes, and for only coming into town to seduce beautiful young women. Not that young Sophie cares for such gossip; she’s always been a homely, responsible girl, and Howl’s not the least interested in that sort of woman. That’s what they say, anyhow. When Sophie runs afoul of a rather nasty witch and finds herself burdened with a curse that makes her appear (and feel) like an old woman, she leaves her home and wanders into the wastes where she happens to run right into Howl’s castle! Given a courage she never had when she looked young, Sophie elbows her way in and firmly settles herself as the new cleaning lady (and yes, they desperately need one!). What she finds while there is a prissy, womanizing, rather hopeless young wizard, to be sure, but there’s more to Howl that gossip would suggest, and Sophie’s bound to find it out.

I absolutely love Howl’s Moving Castle! Of course, it’s a fusion of two things I absolutely love already: Diana Wynne Jones and Studio Ghibli. The story is one of those amazing cases where the book and the movie–while having some characters, ideas, and events in common–are essentially unique and can be regarded as completely separate stories. They’re different enough that I can enjoy both without constantly comparing the two (and so, I will review the book another time). Ghibli’s Howl is incredible: a blend of the absurdly humorous, the epically fantastic, and the sweetly romantic that creates something greater than the sum of the parts. The scenery is gorgeous in the extreme, especially the mountain landscapes. The machines are fascinating (slightly steampunk, but not quite)–from the classic Miyazaki flying machines to the train running through town to the cobbled-together castle walking on four legs. A strong anti-war message permeates the story (but not overpoweringly)–again classic Miyazaki/Ghibli, it seems. The soundtrack is also amazing, absolutely beautiful (Joe Hisaishi, what else need be said?). Perhaps most outstanding in this movie are the characters: Sophie, who always underestimates herself. Calcifer, the stubborn fire-demon who’s actually quite cute (and very good for comic relief). Cute little Markl, Howl’s apprentice. And of course, Howl himself–indecipherable, devastatingly beautiful, selfish, secretive, overly dramatic, too concerned about his looks, yet somehow so much better a person than he seems like he could be. (May I just say, I love the green ooze tantrum?!) All in all, Howl’s Moving Castle is one of my absolute favorite movies, one I come back to regularly and never find disappointing. You should check it out!

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Porco Rosso

Studio Ghibli

Written & Directed by Hayao Miyazaki/Produced by Toshio Suzuki/Music by Joe Hisaishi

Once a WWI ace fighter pilot, Porco Rosso is now a hero and an iconic figure around the Adriatic as he flies his legendary red sea plane to hunt down the sea-plane pirates who plague the area. It’s not uncommon for reporters to track him down at his friend Gina’s bar, looking for an exclusive story . . . although Porco prefers isolating himself in an upstairs room where Gina has a table set aside just for him. Of course, he’s not popular with everyone; some of his enemies actually plot against him to get his plane shot down! And when he goes to Milan to get his plane repaired, well, things get even more interesting, since the Italians have a warrant out for his head.

I absolutely love Studio Ghibli movies, and Hayao Miyazaki’s ones in particular. Porco Rosso is no exception, although it’s pretty different from some of his other stories. It’s one of the most centered in a real place and time–in spite of the whole fantasy element of Porco’s being turned into a pig, which is never explained in great detail. The story has a nice balance of action, adventure, humor, and romance, even while dealing with difficult topics like war; I find that quite impressive. Plus, between Gina and Fio, there are some incredible, gutsy heroines (Miyazaki’s heroines in general are some of the best!). I’m not really into aircraft, but Miyazaki’s planes in here are really neat to see (even if not 100% realistic)–if you can’t tell, aircraft is something of an obsession for him (just watch his other movies, and you’ll see what I mean). The art in Porco Rosso is really pretty too–not to a Spirited Away level of detail, but very nice still–and the setting is absolutely beautiful. I love the open ending, too. Overall, I think Porco Rosso is a fun, touching movie–although I would only recommend it for an older (PG 13) audience because of some of the allusions and language.

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Lupin the III: The Castle of Cagliostro

Tokyo Movie Shinsha

Produced by Yutaka Fujioka & Tetsuo Katayama/Directed by Hayao Miyazaki/Written by Hayao Miyazaki & Haruya Yamazaki/Music by Yuji Ohno/Based on the Manga by Monkey Punch

If there’s danger, mayhem, and questionable motives, Lupin is bound to be in the middle of the fray. Naturally, when he encounters a fortune–in counterfeit bills–he’s determined to get to the root of their origins. When he traces them to the small country of Cagliostro’s current ruler, he’s determined to break in and cause as much chaos as possible–and when he finds that the beautiful princess of the country is being held against her will, well, that seals the deal for sure. Lupin and his comrades descend upon the castle, wrecking havoc and confusion as they go . . . and even more madness when Lupin’s old nemesis, the leader of the Japanese police, shows up with his troops!

The Castle of Cagliostro is a grand old adventure–more romp than anything else, to be honest. In a lot of ways, it makes me think of an old European action movie (or an extended episode of Scooby Doo) more than of a Japanese anime. I think my brother puts it best: “I love how it’s so Miyazaki and yet not at all!” That’s truly my experience of the story. It’s a grand romantic adventure in the best sense, with plenty of action and plot twists, but really, you can’t take it seriously at all. There’s just too much that’s comedic–or incredible and absurd–and I think it’s meant to be that way. The art is really old-school, which works beautifully with the story in a super-retro kind of way. Basically, this movie is just meant to be a lot of fun, and it excels at that. Do be warned that there’s probably more language than would be appropriate for most kids. For teen/adult audiences who are in the mood for something off the wall and fun though, The Castle of Cagliostro is a great choice.

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