Tag Archives: contemporary

Giant Days, vol. 1 (Graphic Novel)

Author: John Allison/Illustrator: Lissa Treiman/Colorist: Whitney Cogar

My rating: 5 of 5

Susan, Daisy, and Esther became fast friends when they began their university studies together. Yes, they all have their individual quirks–you could even say that they’re very different from each other. But perhaps it’s those very differences that make them good for each other, that help them through the complications of studies, relationships, illness, and drama that plague them along the way. Certainly, those quirks keep things interesting, as long as they can survive living in Esther’s drama zone, dealing with Susan’s mysterious past, and helping Daisy handle the big, scary world despite her (shocking) innocence.

I think I’m in love! Giant Days is everything I ask for in a graphic novel. The art is charming–a contemporary style similar to, say, Nimona or Seconds or even Kibuishi’s work, but with its own unique flair–and the coloring is just perfect–vibrant but not overdone. And the tone of the story is spot on, giving us a current, relatable slice of life story that touches on deep issues but never goes so far that we lose sight of the lighter side of things. And there’s plenty of the lighter side to be found here; this graphic novel is brimming with humor in abundance. There’s just enough quirkiness to the characters and the situations they find themselves in to appeal to the nerdier audiences, but the story is such a solid, timely slice-of-life story that I think a lot of YA/NA readers will find themselves charmed by this work as well. The characters are strong and interesting, and their depiction is vivid and captivating. I’m excited to see what Giant Days will bring in future volumes.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Psychic in the City (Psych/White Collar Crossover Fanfic)

Author: DTS

FanFiction ID: 10162083

Status: Complete (8 Chapters)

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Shawn Spencer and Neal Caffrey first met in a museum in Chicago when they were both still just teenagers, striking up an unusual but lasting friendship. Nearly a decade later, Shawn finds himself in New York, pulled into the FBI’s White Collar division as a consultant in the search for an international art thief, forger, and con man–only to quickly discover that the man in question is his old friend, at which point, Shawn quickly removes himself from the case. Years later, Shawn and Gus are once again in New York, and Shawn stops by the White Collar office to say hi, finding himself unexpectedly face to face with none other than Neal Caffrey, now a CI for the FBI! Happy reunions are had, new friendships are made, and stories are told all around . . . but it appears that these friends aren’t the only old acquaintances in New York, and someone has ill intentions towards Shawn and Neal.

These two stories are ones I’ve wanted to see a crossover fic for basically since I first discovered the shows. And DTS does a great job melding these stories in Psychic in the City. I love the way the author builds up this backstory, using a series of unrelated encounters that inevitably bring them all together in the end–the history and the time factor add a nice touch to the story. The author does a good job with the characters as well, although in some ways I wish they had been a bit more strongly characterized, if that makes any sense at all. Shawn and Neal are a lot alike, but they’re also really different, and although I can see them bonding over their similarities, I can also see them exasperated/baffled by their differences. But I guess I also like the idea of them finding someone in each other that they can be themselves with, sans all the acting and the fronts they both put up generally. What I’m trying to say is that, although the characterizations weren’t exactly what I expected or would have done myself, I liked them and found them to be credible and in-character–and what more can I ask than that? The plot was also interesting and entirely plausible for these guys, but warnings for a major cliffhanger ending. There’s a sequel, though, which will probably be reviewed here shortly. Psychic in the City is definitely a recommended story for those who enjoy these two shows.

Note: You can find Psychic in the City at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10162083/1/Psychic-in-the-City.

1 Comment

Filed under Media Review

Psych: The Movie (2017)

USA Network

Sequel to Psych

My rating: 3.5 of 5

Shawn and Gus have properly settled in to life in San Francisco (having been there for three years already). They’ve opened a new office in Chinatown, which Shawn has cleverly (in his own opinion) named psychphrancisco. Yeah, not the most successful psychic detective agency ever, but whatever; Gus has a full-time job to help support their rent and such when they don’t have cases. Oh yeah, and Shawn and Juliet still aren’t married . . . which may actually have something to do with why Shawn is snooping around shady areas of town wearing Gus’s Hagrid costume. Looking for a stolen ring perhaps? But it quickly becomes clear that the gang have more important (or at least more immediate) issues to handle when Juliet becomes the target of a mystery killer–one that will require all their combined skills to bring to justice.

The best way to describe Psych: The Movie is that it’s an extended episode of the show. So if you like the show, you’ll probably like the movie and vice versa. I have to say, it’s fun to see the gang back together again. The Shawn/Gus dynamic is going strong. I honestly think they sat down and figured out how they could cram as many of the classic running gags for the series into one episode as possible–and include some new plays off the old bits as well. As such, the movie is funny. Very funny in a goofy Psych kind of way. And did I mention random? Because it’s definitely random, right from the get go. On the negative side, I really, really wish we had gotten more of Lassiter than a video call offering support. I miss having him be a part of the gang–if for no other reason than that no one else is as good at picking on Shawn. But we did get a good cast, including Shawn, Gus, Jules, Chief Vick, Shawn’s dad, and (randomly but welcomely) Woody. The villains were kind of annoying more than actually menacing (other than the whole kidnapping thing), and the main plot didn’t really stand out to me. But let’s be honest, how many of us watch Psych for the plot, anyhow? We do get some cute Shules action here–including some resolution to the end of the TV series. Yay! So yeah, basically if you like the show, I would recommend the movie.

Written by Steve Franks & James Roday/Directed by Steve Franks/Starring James Roday, Dulé Hill, Timothy Omundson, Maggie Lawson, Kirsten Nelson, & Corbin Bernsen

Leave a comment

Filed under Media Review

The Invisible Museum (Manga)

Mangaka: Kore Yamazaki

Status: Complete (Oneshot)

My rating: 4 of 5

She’s the daughter who was left, unwanted, with her drunken mother after the divorce while her father took her brother with him. Sometimes she just wants to escape, to disappear. One day, she finds herself in front of a building she’s never seen before, and curious, she enters to find herself in what appears to be a museum, complete with display cases . . . only the cases are completely empty.

The Invisible Museum is a thought-provoking oneshot by the author of the popular The Ancient Magus’ Bride. It’s a strange tale, almost reminiscent in a way to CLAMP’s xxxHOLiC with its strange building that’s not visible to everyone, its enigmatic proprietor, and its strange, mystical creatures. I like it. It deals with a challenging emotional situation in a way that raises good questions without claiming to have all the answers. (Fair warning that it sort-of deals with the topic of suicide/suicidal ideations, but in a generalized, non-graphic sort of way.) I love the back and forth between the girl and the proprietor–even in this short oneshot, their personalities shine through. I could totally see this story being developed into an actual series, and I would be thrilled if it ever came to pass. The art is classic Kore Yamazaki, but in a sense only parts of it (like the butterfly) seem like it at first glance–because it’s really strange to see Yamazaki’s work set in contemporary Japan as opposed to somewhere in Europe, in a highly fantasy-like setting. I really enjoyed The Invisible Museum and would recommend to anyone who likes a solid, slightly fantastic manga.

Note: I read this as an omake in the first volume of Frau Faust. I’m not sure if it’s available anywhere else or not.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Read (Psych Tie-in Novel)

Author: William Rabkin

Tie-in to Psych

My rating: 3.5 of 5

It’s really all Shawn’s fault, not that that’s anything new. First, Gus’s car got towed because Shawn said it would be fine to park in the reserved zone, and they were running late in the first place. Then when they went to the impound lot to get the Blueberry, Gus got hit with a huge bill for all the times Shawn “borrowed” his car and parked where he wasn’t supposed to. Then they got shot at (obviously somehow Shawn’s fault, right?). Then Gus nearly got hit by a speeding car while running away from the gunman. And now they’ve got the driver of said speeding car, an admittedly attractive but clearly loony woman, following them around claiming she’s receiving psychic instructions from Shawn. Which is rubbish, because Shawn’s not even actually psychic. How does Gus manage to get in these situations?! Oh right, it’s Shawn’s fault.

A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Read was a surprisingly good TV-show tie-in novel. All too often, these sorts of books are clearly written by someone who has only a minimal grasp of the show (if that), and the characterizations and writing suffer because of that. This book, on the other hand, actually read essentially like an episode of the show–down to the flashback at the beginning! The plot is as convoluted and unpredictable as ever, driven on by Shawn’s random grasping at ideas. But then, when is the plot ever actually the point of this show anyhow? Shawn’s randomness, goofiness, and unexpected (to all but the readers) brilliance and the whole Shawn-Gus dynamic were well done; they felt true to the characters that I know and love from the show. For those who love the rest of the gang (and I do), this story does leave a bit lacking in that department. You’ve got a smattering of Henry and a touch of Chief Vick and Lassie, but just barely that. And Juliet’s part doesn’t bear mentioning; it’s sad, that’s what it is. And I do love some Shules in my Psych stories, so I missed her. But despite the lack of some of my favorite characters, I think A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Read was well written and enjoyable–recommended for those who like the show.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Review

Rainy Days (Miraculous Ladybug Fanfic)

Author: TheLastPilot

FanFiction ID: 11588623

Status: Complete (10 Chapters)

My rating: 5 of 5

Cat Noir adores Ladybug, has fallen for her utterly, but the truth is that he barely knows her, doesn’t know her true identity and all the tiny personal details that go along with that at all. Meanwhile, Adrien (Cat Noir’s true identity) finds himself fascinated and troubled by the quiet, sweet girl at school who can’t seem to bring herself to even talk to him, even though she’s clearly smart, funny, and even courageous when around other classmates. Perhaps these rainy days (both literally and metaphorically) will give Adrien and Marinette the chance to get to know each other, to become friends even if they can’t become boyfriend and girlfriend as Marinette would like. Secret identities have a way of getting in the way of relationships. Yet in spite of that, the two find themselves drawn to each other, both in their true identities and in their superhero alter egos. Talk about confusion! Maybe one of these rainy days, they’ll trust each other enough disclose some of those secrets.

Rainy Days is exactly what I wanted in a Miraculous fanfic! The writing is well done, balancing the different perspectives well and including the kind of details that give the story body and depth. The story is adorable and sweet, but with enough conflict and tension to be interesting–properly flangsty (fluffy and angsty). You’ve got a touch of the typical plotlines–rampaging akumatized classmates and the like–which gives the story the proper context and flavor, but the focus of the story isn’t really on that. It’s primarily a story about a budding, beautiful friendship that gradually grows into the potential for something more. The slow-burn growth of Marinette and Adrien’s relationship is a beautiful thing; major kudos to the author for doing this remarkably well. Again, the little details make a huge difference here. At times, the story feels almost like a character study of the main characters, each from the other’s perspective. And can I just say how much I love the way the reveal was handled?! Also, props to the author for managing to craft a story that would appeal to the older viewers of the show while keeping it clean enough for all but the youngest viewers–technically it’s rated T, and there’s a few mild bits of language and a touch of whumpish action right towards the end, but it’s all pretty much PG at the worst. Seriously, Rainy Days is a clean, adorable friendship/romance story that fulfills basically everything I want from a Miraculous fic; highly recommended.

Note: You can find Rainy Days at https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11588623/1/Rainy-Days.

Leave a comment

Filed under Media Review

Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir (2015- Cartoon)

Zagtoon with Method Animation, Toei Animation, SAMG Animation, AB Droits Audiovisuels, SK Broadband, & De Agostini Editore

Status: Ongoing (2 Seasons, 34 episodes)

My rating: 4 of 5

In present-day Paris, Marinette deals with the same things most students do–friends, schoolwork, crushing on the cutest boy in the school. Not that Adrien seems to even notice her particularly, although it would help if she could actually talk to him without tripping all over herself and looking like an idiot. But that’s not all she deals with, because you see, Marinette has a secret alter-ego–the superhero Ladybug, sworn protector of Paris along with her partner Cat Noir.

Miraculous Ladybug was a fun, unexpected find for me, something I’ve heard other people mention but didn’t have high expectations for myself. It’s a French kids’ CGI adventure show, and it’s pretty random for something like that to even cross the radar in the States anyhow. Not surprising, though, considering that this show is actually quite good. It pulls from a lot of different sources, giving it a unique flavor–kind of a mix of mahou shojou and your more traditional superhero stories, but also a cute slice-of-life story. The CG can feel a bit stilted at times, but overall the animation is excellent if not my ideal style; it still has some cute anime influences, which is fun. This story is solidly a kids’ show. It’s clean–astonishingly so, in fact. It has the repetition, the set episode pattern, to make it ideal for a younger audience (although that very thing may get kind of annoying for older viewers). By the end of each episode, everything is cleaned up and put back right, and the city views Ladybug and Cat Noir as proper heroes. Moreover, the show teaches important life lessons like responsibility, honesty, and courage. All of which make this an excellent show for children, but there is actually something there for older viewers, too. Because behind the masks and the cheesy villains and all, you’ve got some awesome characters who show growth over time. You’ve got diversity. You’ve got an adorable slow-burn romance. You’ve got real, developed friendships and Marinette has an awesome, supportive family. So there’s more than meets the eye in this cute kids’ show. I’m looking forward to seeing where Miraculous Ladybug goes in the future (I’ve only seen season 1 so far), although I’m dying for some development and a reveal between Adrien and Marinette. We’ll see if/when that ever comes.

Created by Thomas Astruc/Written by Thomas Astruc & Sébastien Thibaudeau/Directed by Thomas Astruc, Christelle Abgrall, Wilifried Pain, & Jun Violet/Music by Jeremy Zag, Noam Kaniel, & Alain Garcia/Voiced (in English) by Cristina Vee, Bryce Papenbrook, Keith Silverstein, Mela Lee, Max Mittelman, & Carrie Keranen

1 Comment

Filed under Media Review