Tag Archives: bishounen

The Demon Prince of Momochi House (Manga)

Mangaka: Aya Shouto

Status: Ongoing (currently 12 volumes)

My rating: 4.5 of 5

When she turns sixteen, orphan Himari Momochi mysteriously receives a will stating she’s inherited her family’s ancestral home, Momochi House. Not that she thinks to question it much; it’s a true windfall, and she cheerily packs her bags and sets off into the mountains to move in. Only, once she arrives, she finds this mysterious boy Aoi is already living there, claiming to be the house’s guardian, along with a variety of yokai. Because apparently the house is on the border between the human world and the otherworld, a gateway of sorts. Not one to be so easily discouraged, Himari determinedly declares she’s the house’s landlady and tries to get the squatters to leave . . . only to be confronted with the fact that Aoi literally cannot leave the premises since he’s been chosen as the house’s guardian. Well, Himari’s not about to leave either, even if it does mean she has to share her home and deal with whatever weirdness comes through from the otherworld. And believe me, the weirdness is just beginning.

Personally, I find The Demon Prince of Momochi House well worth reading for the gorgeousness of its art alone, especially the color spreads at the beginning of each volume. Absolutely stunning. As for the story itself, well, I’m almost tempted to think of it as xxxHOLiC lite. You’ve got all these encounters with traditional Japanese yokai and suchlike, as well as other traditional folklore, all set in this mysterious house on the border between worlds. Yeah, sound familiar? But instead of this dark josei sort of flavor, you’ve got something much more traditionally shoujo. Bishounen galore–and it’s only Himari’s fixation with Aoi that keeps this from becoming some kind of reverse-harem situation–for one. A tendency for shoujo tropes, gentle romance, and a generally lighter tone in spite of going to some dark places at times. Oh, and Himari is a pretty classic shoujo heroine–innocent, romantic, stubborn, slightly blonde, and a total do-gooder. But she’s pretty likeable for all that. And Aoi’s mysterious dark past (and sometimes present) kind of counterbalances her air-headed sweetness. Shouto-sensei actually does quite a good job at making the characters more nuanced than you’d expect, especially through their facial expressions. I really love Aoi’s variety of expression in particular; well, I love his character in general, so there’s that too. Currently there’s a lot of uncertainty still as far as where the story will go, but it’s shoujo enough that I’m hoping for a sweet, satisfying end. I’m certainly curious where the story will go from here.

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The Betrayal Knows My Name (manga)

Mangaka: Hotaru Odagiri/Translator: Melissa Tanaka

Status: Complete (8 volumes, although the first 5 are 2-volume omnibus editions, so really more like 13 volumes)

My rating: 5 of 5

Growing up in an orphanage, believing his parents didn’t want him, Yuki struggles to find meaning in his existence. Yet even in the midst of his pain, he brings kindness and healing to those around him, perhaps even more so as he begins to develop the ability to see a person’s emotions and past when he comes into physical contact with them . . . although not everyone takes his kind intentions well. But as Yuki’s strange ability grows stronger and other odd things being to happen around him, he encounters a beautiful, silver-eyed man calling himself Zess who seems oddly familiar. Then another beautiful man comes to the orphanage claiming to be Yuki’s long-lost older brother. Not only that, but Yuki actually has a large extended family, all of whom are delighted to meet him, and Zess is somehow connected to them all as well. But all is not well for this family as they find themselves trapped in a centuries long war against dark and evil forces, being endlessly reincarnated to fight over and over again. And Yuki himself is a pivotal figure in this was, the reincarnation of their princess, bringing healing and hope to them all . . . if only he could figure out why he doesn’t remember anything about his previous lives. All he wants to do is bring an end to this war and to the hurt felt by these people he has quickly come to love.

Love this manga soooo much! If you can imagine a mashup of Fruits Basket and Black Butler, you probably have a pretty good idea of what The Betrayal Knows My Name is like. You’ve got the gorgeous art (and people), demon contracts, and mystery/fight aspects that you find in Kuroshitsuji. Then you’ve got the super air-headed and kind MC, the oversized cast, the reincarnation aspect, and the dark family history themes that you find in Furuba. Not necessarily an expected combination, but it works. It’s beautiful and heartbreaking and mysterious–but there’s a nice mix of cutesy slice-of-life segments filled with sweetness and humor as well. The cast is huuuuge, so it is admittedly hard to keep track of everyone at first, but as you get to know the characters, they become not only unmistakable but beloved. It’s rare for me to find a story in which I love so many of the characters so very much, which is one of the primary reasons that I give this a full five-star rating. As for the plot, there’s currently a lot of mystery and unknowns that could go in a lot of directions, so I’m curious to see whether it ends up some huge shounen-style fight or a hug-it-out shoujo conclusion or something else altogether. (I’m hankering for a very sappily sweet shoujo ending myself, but I’ll be thrilled just to see this story finished, whatever the conclusion. It’s been on hiatus for 4 years, and I had given up hope that it would every be continued. Soooo . . . happy dance that the mangaka has picked this series up again!) Fair warning that the mangaka is fairly well known for writing yaoi stories, but also firm clarification that this particular manga is not yaoi at all–it sits on the verge between shoujo and josei with aspects of shounen and a mild shounen ai flavor, but it never goes beyond that. So honestly, The Betrayal Knows My Name is generally appropriate–and highly recommended–for any T+ audience. Love it and looking forward to reading the rest!

Update 6/29/18 – So this series is officially complete now (data above updated to reflect this). Or at least as complete as it’s going to get. The mangaka got it to a reasonable stopping point, and has declared it done due to health reasons and such. There are still a lot of loose ends and unknowns that I would have loved to see developed more, but we did get some major stuff resolved and at least got to the reasonable conclusion of the current story arc, so I’m glad for that. The story leaves us at a point where things are still uncertain but hopeful, which I can accept. Still definitely a 5 star recommended read.

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Alice in the Country of Hearts

alice in the country of heartsStory: QuinRose

Art: Soumei Hoshino

My rating: 4 of 5

One afternoon, while waiting for her oh-so-elegant and admired older sister to bring back a game for them to play together, Alice drifts into the world of dreams . . . or so she thinks anyway. She opens her eyes, and is promptly dragged down a huge hole and forced to drink a vial full of potion, all by a strange, pushy guy with rabbit ears. Then, Alice is informed that the only way she can go home is by refilling that vial by interacting with the people of the wonder world in which she has landed. Believing she is still dreaming, Alice does just that, developing friendships with the various inhabitants of this world and finding a place in the clock-work hearts of many of them.

Alice in the Country of Hearts is a fun retake on the classic Alice in Wonderland. It’s actually based on an otome visual novel, which artist Soumei Hoshino has adapted into manga format. The art is quite nice–pretty and expressive without being overdone. The real appeal of the story is definitely the characters. During her stay in the wonder world, Alice encounters most of the characters from the Carroll version, only in this story they are mostly attractive guys. The personalities do seem to carry over fairly well from the original, while being imbued with a life of their own in addition. A true plus for this story is that, unlike in far too many otome stories, Alice herself is a strong character–warm, open, and a bit less that elegant. Her interactions with the Queen of Hearts (another strong, multifaceted female character) also add an important dimension to the story, particularly as they reflect upon her relationship with and image of her older sister. The story line itself sometimes seems a bit directionless, but that suits the work–it’s really mostly about the building of relationships between the characters. Alice in the Country of Hearts is definitely an excellent work for its intended audience–young single females. However, I would actually recommend it for a broader audience, as the rich characterizations– particularly of Alice and the Queen–give it an appeal that reaches beyond the intended gender and genre boundaries.

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