Mouse Bird Snake Wolf

Author: David Almond

Illustrator: Dave McKean

The gods have mostly finished creating a beautiful world full of all sorts of interesting things, but they got bored and lazy before they finished, and now they’re lazing about napping and dining. Meanwhile, the world is left with areas that are simply . . . empty. Living in this world are three children–Harry, Sue, and Little Ben–who take the time to really look at these holes in reality and to imagine what ought to belong there. But they go further than dreaming–they create their dreams out of sticks and clay and will them into life. It’s all wonderful and exciting until Harry and Sue dream up something terrifying . . . something that might be to terrible to be undone.

Well. Mouse Bird Snake Wolf is an imaginative illustrated short story, I must admit. To give it its due, it is creative, bright, cohesive, and has an interesting twist at the end. But . . . I don’t know. I’ve tried reading a few of David Almond’s books, and they never quite resonate with me–I think because there’s a lot of unusual philosophies woven deeply into them so that it’s hard for me to take them at face value. For that very reason, I don’t think I would give this book to children to read, even though it’s pretty clearly marketed as a children’s book; I posit that it is definitely an adult book with adult implications. I’ll let you read it for yourself and form your own opinions regarding that. As for the art, well, being a Neil Gaiman fan, it’s sort of a given that I also greatly enjoy Dave McKean’s work. I think his pictures suit this story nicely, in a weird sort of way. The colors, textures, contrasts, and shapes are probably my favorite part of this book . . . but I think most people would find the pictures to be the weirdest and most disturbing part. Sooo . . . if you’re interested in an unusual, philosophically challenging, and creepily-illustrated short story, you might find Mouse Bird Snake Wolf worth checking out. Frankly, I probably won’t read it again, for what it’s worth.

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